Il fait should always be followed by an adjective, and il y a used with nouns.

ChapelA2Kwiziq community member

Il fait should always be followed by an adjective, and il y a used with nouns.

I am confused by the weather lessons, and the rule above in particular. 

All of the examples of “il y a” in this lesson include adjectives, not nouns.  “Sunny,” “windy” etc. are adjectives. 

On the other hand, it seems to have been established that “il fait” is often not appropriate when there is an adjective, because it sounds childish.  So, that also does not fit the rule.

From this lesson, it seems like the rule never holds true. 

Suggestions:

1.  My suggestion is to remove that rule from this lesson altogether, because it is creating confusion.  If you remove it, we are left with the general rule that “To talk about the weather in French, you will use Il y a + du / de la / de l' / des  + noun.”   Maybe it makes sense to remove the noun reference there too, and replace it with [weather condition]? 

2.  If you click the link to the lesson about “il fait + [adjective]” it states that “to talk about the weather in French, you will use the fixed expression “il fait + [adjective]”.  This statement is directly contradictory to the lesson that says  “To talk about the weather in French, you will use ‘Il y a…’”  They have the same lead-in phrase, but come to different conclusions.

***

For my own use, I’m trying to decide if I should be using “il y a” all the time with weather, and avoiding “il fait” altogether…

OR

Using “il fait” only when I am talking about the quality of the weather (good or bad) or the temperature (hot or cold), but using “il y a” at all other times. 

Thank you.
Asked 1 month ago
ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor Correct answer

I still don't understand what's wrong with the rule that you either use:

1) Il fait + adjective, or
2) Il y a + noun.

In both corresponding lessons it clearly says that "Il fait (du) soleil" is an exception, sounds childish and shouldn't be used.

You write: (quote) On the other hand, it seems to have been established that “il fait” is often not appropriate when there is an adjective, because it sounds childish.  So, that also does not fit the rule. (unquote)

Where did you get that information? So il fait froid should not be used??? I hear it said all the time.

Il fait should always be followed by an adjective, and il y a used with nouns.

I am confused by the weather lessons, and the rule above in particular. 

All of the examples of “il y a” in this lesson include adjectives, not nouns.  “Sunny,” “windy” etc. are adjectives. 

On the other hand, it seems to have been established that “il fait” is often not appropriate when there is an adjective, because it sounds childish.  So, that also does not fit the rule.

From this lesson, it seems like the rule never holds true. 

Suggestions:

1.  My suggestion is to remove that rule from this lesson altogether, because it is creating confusion.  If you remove it, we are left with the general rule that “To talk about the weather in French, you will use Il y a + du / de la / de l' / des  + noun.”   Maybe it makes sense to remove the noun reference there too, and replace it with [weather condition]? 

2.  If you click the link to the lesson about “il fait + [adjective]” it states that “to talk about the weather in French, you will use the fixed expression “il fait + [adjective]”.  This statement is directly contradictory to the lesson that says  “To talk about the weather in French, you will use ‘Il y a…’”  They have the same lead-in phrase, but come to different conclusions.

***

For my own use, I’m trying to decide if I should be using “il y a” all the time with weather, and avoiding “il fait” altogether…

OR

Using “il fait” only when I am talking about the quality of the weather (good or bad) or the temperature (hot or cold), but using “il y a” at all other times. 

Thank you.

Sign in to submit your answer

Don't have an account yet? Join today

Ask a question

Find your French level for FREE

Test your French to the CEFR standard

Find your French level >>
Clever stuff underway!