Omitting 'le' when talking about weekdays In a specific context

Tamani

Kwiziq community member

22 July 2017

8 replies

Omitting 'le' when talking about weekdays In a specific context

Gontran a décommissionné le jeudi 12 mars. Couldn't the 'le' be omitted since we have here a specific weekday?

This relates to:
Using le with days of the week + weekend -

Ron

Kwiziq community member

23 July 2017

23/07/17

In a word, no. Anytime the day and date is spelled out, like in your example, the «le» is required.
This is covered in the lesson above using the day and date section.
Bonne chance.

Ron

Kwiziq community member

23 July 2017

23/07/17

one other thing of note, in my French class, the prof always starts out by asking the date and it is written on the chalkboard thusly, Dimanche, le 23 juillet 2017

Tamani

Kwiziq community member

23 July 2017

23/07/17

Oh yeah! I forgot about the day and date section! And thanks for the note about your French teacher. That helps to lock it in my memory.

Ron

Kwiziq community member

23 July 2017

23/07/17

Pas de problème! Je suis très ravi que j'ai pu vous aider.

Bonne chance dans vos études en Français.
Ron

Tamani

Kwiziq community member

24 July 2017

24/07/17

Merci beaucoup Ron!

On second thought, shouldn't your teacher have written le dimanche 23 juillet 2017?

Ron

Kwiziq community member

24 July 2017

24/07/17

Bonjour,
Here is an example from another site.
Writing the Date in French

Writing the date out in French is different to the North American system. In French, you must reverse the month and day. This can be a bit confusing at first for Americans but should not cause any confusion for people from the UK as they use the same system. Here are some useful examples:

le 5 juin 2012 5/6/2012
June 5, 2012 6/5/2012

le 25 décembre 2012 25/12/2012
December 25, 2012 12/25/2012

le 3 november 2012 11/03/2012
November 3, 2012 03/11/2012

and yet another example from a different site:
Write and pronounce the date, including the day of the week. This is identical to writing the date, with the day of the week added to the front of the phrase. Here's an example:
English: Wednesday, the 5th of June
French (written): mercredi, le 5 juin 2001 (formal)
French (written): mercredi 5 juin 2001 (normal)
French (spoken): mercredi cinq juin deux mille un
French (spoken): le mercredi cinq juin deux mille un (eventually if you want to describe a precise day)

Tamani

Kwiziq community member

25 July 2017

25/07/17

Wow! Thank you for your thorough reply! Yes, I've always understood the day, date, month, year order; now I will REally have the 'le with days of the week'
ingrained in my brain! Again, thank you for your time, and soon I will be writing these in French! Merci beaucoup!

Ron

Kwiziq community member

25 July 2017

25/07/17

Just remember that we did not learn our mother tongue in a short period of time and like that, French will take time to become truly proficient.

Bonne chance.

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