Passer + preposition. uses "être" in passé composé.

OwenB1Kwiziq community member

Passer + preposition. uses "être" in passé composé.

In the lesson on the above topic, it states that if "passer" is followed by a direct object, it uses "avoir" in the passé composé.

Elle est passée chez Laurent hier.She passed by Laurent's place yesterday.
Here, passer is followed by a direct object, yet uses "être".Should the translation be:  Elle est passée par chez Laurent hier?This example seems to contradict the rule, even though it is a verb of motion in this sentence. Should have a preposition.

Asked 1 year ago
MaartenC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor Correct answer

The sentence does have a preposition between passer and the noun - ‘chez’.

“Par chez” would be consecutive prepositions and incorrect.

https://www.wordreference.com/fren/chez

Passer + preposition. uses "être" in passé composé.

In the lesson on the above topic, it states that if "passer" is followed by a direct object, it uses "avoir" in the passé composé.

Elle est passée chez Laurent hier.She passed by Laurent's place yesterday.
Here, passer is followed by a direct object, yet uses "être".Should the translation be:  Elle est passée par chez Laurent hier?This example seems to contradict the rule, even though it is a verb of motion in this sentence. Should have a preposition.

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