what is finies

GokceA2Kwiziq community member

what is finies

Hello,

In the sentence below, finies means gone/finished, but is it used as a noun or is something different? I checked the conjugator there is no such thing as finies, too. What kind of usage is this?

Finies mes journees tranquilles !

Asked 2 months ago
IraB2Kwiziq community memberCorrect answer

The past participle “fini” (here written as “finies” because it agrees with “journées”) is used as an adjective and the word order is changed for emphasis: "Finies mes journées tranquilles.” just means “Mes journées tranquilles sont finies.”

We do the same thing in English: "Gone are the good old days when....” meaning “The good old days when....are gone."

HopeB2Kwiziq community member

Hi!

In this case "finies" isn't conjugated, but instead made to agree. It takes the form of an adjective here, and since "journées tranquilles" is both feminine and plural, an 'e' and an 's' must be added to the past participle of finir (fini) to make agreement, which makes "finies." At least, I think that's the case!

MichaelC1Kwiziq community member

It's an adjective. It agrees with "mes journées" which is feminine plural. It's an inverted word order as in the English phrase "gone are my quiet days" meaning "my quiet days are gone".

what is finies

Hello,

In the sentence below, finies means gone/finished, but is it used as a noun or is something different? I checked the conjugator there is no such thing as finies, too. What kind of usage is this?

Finies mes journees tranquilles !

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