Celui, celle, ceux, celles = the one(s) (demonstrative pronouns)

Look at these sentences:

Eva aime mes biscuits mais déteste ceux de sa tante.
Eva likes my biscuits but hates her aunt's.

Celles que je préfère sont les pommes vertes.
The ones I prefer are the green apples.

Dans ce groupe, le chanteur est celui avec des lunettes.
In this band, the singer is the one with glasses.

Regarde ces filles. Celle qui court s'appelle Sophia.
Look at those girls. The one running is called Sophia.

 


Notice that to avoid repetition, you can use the following pronouns:
celui / celle (the one), ceux / celles (the ones).

Note also that the pronouns agree in gender and number with the thing they refer to.

  Masculine Feminine
Singular celui celle
Plural ceux celles

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Eva aime mes biscuits mais déteste ceux de sa tante.
Eva likes my biscuits but hates her aunt's.



Celles que je préfère sont les pommes vertes.
The ones I prefer are the green apples.


Dans ce groupe, le chanteur est celui avec des lunettes.
In this band, the singer is the one with glasses.


Regarde ces filles. Celle qui court s'appelle Sophia.
Look at those girls. The one running is called Sophia.


C'est ton fils? - Non, c'est celui de Paul.
Is it your son? - No, it's Paul's (one).


Q&A Forum 6 questions, 6 answers

ScottC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

celui-ci, celui-là, etc.

Hi,

I have seen celui-ci, celui-là, celle-ci, etc. used in text and I believe I have even seen them covered in a French class. I've looked, but can't seem to find any lesson that covers them on this site. Would you be able to explain when and how they are used as compared to simply celui, celle, etc as covered in this lesson?

thanks, Scott

Asked 8 months ago

celui-ci, celui-là, etc.

Hi,

I have seen celui-ci, celui-là, celle-ci, etc. used in text and I believe I have even seen them covered in a French class. I've looked, but can't seem to find any lesson that covers them on this site. Would you be able to explain when and how they are used as compared to simply celui, celle, etc as covered in this lesson?

thanks, Scott

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BarbaraC1Kwiziq community member

Regarding: "Tu amèneras ta cousine à la fête." "J'ai appris que le verb "amener" est utilisé dans le passé et emmener est le verb pour le present et

Asked 9 months ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Barbara,

It is not a question of tenses but of direction -

Amener is to bring, 

Emmener is to take

These are normally used for people as it comes from ‘main’.

For things it will be

Apporter v Emporter (something you can ‘porter’ to carry...)

Hope this helps!

 

Regarding: "Tu amèneras ta cousine à la fête." "J'ai appris que le verb "amener" est utilisé dans le passé et emmener est le verb pour le present et

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BillC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

This dawned on me today...

to help me remember which demonstrative pronoun to use.  I'm surprised i haven't come across this somewhere else because now it seems obvious to me.

Anyway, thought i'd share in case it can help others.

Think of them like this:

ce-lui

c-eux

c-elle

c-elles

of course, just remove the hyphen and you have your correct demonstrative pronoun!

Asked 10 months ago
CécileKwiziq team member

Hi Bill, 

Thank you for this , it might help others...

 

This dawned on me today...

to help me remember which demonstrative pronoun to use.  I'm surprised i haven't come across this somewhere else because now it seems obvious to me.

Anyway, thought i'd share in case it can help others.

Think of them like this:

ce-lui

c-eux

c-elle

c-elles

of course, just remove the hyphen and you have your correct demonstrative pronoun!

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CrystalMaidenC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

So you're never allowed to use l'un(e) or l'uns to mean the one, then?

Asked 1 year ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi CrytalMaiden,

If you mean you are  'the One' in a romantic sense, you would say,

Tu es l'homme/la femme de ma vie.

Tu es fait pour moi.

Nous sommes faits l'un pour l'autre.

OR you would use 'l'Elu(e)' in the chosen, heroic sense.

Hope this helps!

 

 

 

 

So you're never allowed to use l'un(e) or l'uns to mean the one, then?

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DavidB2Kwiziq community member

Error in question?

J'aime tes chaussures mais je préfère ________ qu'elle a achetées. I love your shoes but I prefer the ones she bought. Achetées?
Asked 2 years ago
AurélieKwiziq team memberCorrect answer
Bonjour David !
Yes, this is not a mistake, but one of these tricky rules of agreement :)

Have a look at the following lesson : Special cases when the past participle agrees when used with 'avoir' in Le Passé Composé

Bonne journée !

Error in question?

J'aime tes chaussures mais je préfère ________ qu'elle a achetées. I love your shoes but I prefer the ones she bought. Achetées?

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LeonC1Kwiziq community member

But sometimes "celles" ... means "these", as in "Celles sont les miennes." Right?

Asked 2 years ago
AurélieKwiziq team member
Bonjour Léon ! To express "These are mine", you would actually say "Ce sont les miennes" in French. To say "These ones are mine", you will need to use "Celles-ci / Celles-là sont les miennes": this is the colloquial use here. "Celles sont les miennes" is not correct in French, you need a qualifier (-ci or -là) to specify which alternative you're referring to (these or those). I hope that's helpful! Bonne Année !

But sometimes "celles" ... means "these", as in "Celles sont les miennes." Right?

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