Saying your name: Je m'appelle, Tu t'appelles, Vous vous appelez

Look at these examples:

Comment tu t'appelles?
What is your name?

Comment vous vous appelez?
What is your name?

Je m'appelle Aurélie.
My name is Aurélie.

Tu t'appelles Théo.
Your name is Théo.

Vous vous appelez Monsieur Durand.
Your name is Mr Durand.

To say your name in French, you use the verb s'appeler (literally "to call oneself")

If you want to be informal, use the "tu" form.

If you need to be formal, use the "vous" form.

Note the difference in spelling between appelle / appelles and appelez

 

ATTENTION:

It's tempting to translate Je m'appelle... as I call myself... but despite this being its literal translation, this is not correct.

I call myself... implies one's real name is something else, or a choice over one's name.
-> My real name's John but I call myself / everyone calls me Jack.

In French, the equivalent of this is Je me fais appeler..., which has the same implication of choice over the name.

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Comment tu t'appelles?
What is your name?



Tu t'appelles Théo.
Your name is Théo.


Vous vous appelez Monsieur Durand.
Your name is Mr Durand.


Je m'appelle Aurélie.
My name is Aurélie.


Comment vous vous appelez?
What is your name?


Q&A

Faithandrews

Kwiziq community member

8 March 2019

1 reply

Is there a formal way of saying she/he ( Il/Elle)?

Michelle

Kwiziq community member

18 March 2019

18/03/19

Not really. You *could* say monsieur, madame or mademoiselle to avoid saying il or elle, but it's really fine to say il and elle. If you want to speak formally TO a person, you'd of course call them vous. But when speaking to someone else about them, you can say il or elle even if you call the person vous. 

Wellinton

Kwiziq community member

15 February 2019

0 replies

0. Qui concerne les rapports ou contacts entre des civilisations différentes (13 lettres)

Someone to help me solving this? I need to answear today and i tried a lot of French dictionaries and didn't get this. 

Haloui

Kwiziq community member

25 January 2019

2 replies

Can we say her name is like this:elle t'appeller ....

Cécile

Kwiziq language super star

26 January 2019

26/01/19

Hi Haloui,

It would be “Elle s’appelle”.

Haloui

Kwiziq community member

26 January 2019

26/01/19

Aa okey thank you 

Sami

Kwiziq community member

13 December 2018

1 reply

Corrigez-moi . S'il vous plaît

Je m'appelle Sami et j'habite en Egypte.

Chris

Kwiziq community member

14 December 2018

14/12/18

Correct.

Sherin

Kwiziq community member

27 October 2018

1 reply

how do you say i plead in french

Cécile

Kwiziq language super star

27 October 2018

27/10/18

Hi Sherin,

If you mean 'to plead' as 'to implore' it would be -

ImplorerSupplier 

Je vous supplie de lui passer mon message .

In legalese you would use 'plaider' for 'to plead'-

L'accusé a plaidé non coupable The accused pleaded not guilty

Hope this helps!

marn

Kwiziq community member

23 October 2018

2 replies

I always learned It as “comment vous appelez vous”. Is this not correct?

Chris

Kwiziq community member

23 October 2018

23/10/18

There are different ways to pose a question in French. The one you mention is the so-called inverted form. It is considered more formal and elegant:

Comment vous appelez-vous ?

Then there is the version with est-ce que:

Comment est-ce que vous vous appelez ?

And, lastly, the most common one in normal spoken French:

Comment vous vous appelez ? Or
Vous vous appelez comment ?

 

Sherin

Kwiziq community member

27 October 2018

27/10/18

it is also right ....

in english you can ask what is your name? and your name please? both are right and means the same 

just like that in french both are right 

there are many ways to say something

its your wish how to present it

Philip

Kwiziq community member

16 October 2018

3 replies

"Vous vous appelez Laura" means:

Surely

 Your name is Laura

You call yourself Laura

means the same thing

Chris

Kwiziq community member

16 October 2018

16/10/18

Vous vous appelez Laura in French has the same function as "Your name is Laura" in English. Therefore that's the proper translation. The fact that, literally, it translates to "you call yourself Laura" in English is not really important and only confuses the issue.

Chris

Kwiziq community member

16 October 2018

16/10/18

In English, if you want to learn someone's name, you don't ask, "What do you call yourself?". However, in French you DO say, "Comment vous vous appelez?"

pokemon

Kwiziq community member

10 December 2018

10/12/18

yup its all right

Ryan

Kwiziq community member

12 October 2018

3 replies

I still don’t get it

When do you use “appelez”

Chris

Kwiziq community member

13 October 2018

13/10/18

When the subject is 2nd person plural (vous), the verb form is appelez. 

Cécile

Kwiziq language super star

13 October 2018

13/10/18

Hi Ryan,

The verb 'appeler quelqu'un' is not reflexive when it means to call someone, unlike 's'appeler' which is 'to be called'.

Appelez Marie tout de suite!Call Marie straight away!

Appelez in this instance is the Imperative 'vous' form of the verb 'Appeler'.

Hope this helps!

Ryan

Kwiziq community member

14 October 2018

14/10/18

Thank you Chris and Cécile

Eloise

Kwiziq community member

30 May 2018

1 reply

I answered tu t'appelle Thomas to the question your name is Thomas -- the correct answer was Tu m'apelle Thomas -- why?

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

30 May 2018

30/05/18

Bonjour Eloise !

The correct answer here is "Tu t'appelles", but your answer was actually "Tu m'appelle", which is incorrect :)

Next time, please click the "Report it" button in your Correction Dashboard to report specific question issues, as it enables us to find your question more easily!

Bonne journée !

CrystalMaiden

Kwiziq community member

29 April 2018

1 reply

Is Je suis nom at least a colloquial thing that's correct?

I watched Despicable Me 2 in French a while ago and I heard " Je suis (nom) " from two characters, Margo and the main villain. Is that sometimes correct?

Chris

Kwiziq community member

2 May 2018

2/05/18

Actually, you can hear that said quite often. In my understanding the difference is very much like in English:

Je m'appelle Chris. -- My name is Chris.
Je suis Chris. -- I am Chris.

The former is, well, more formal.

-- Chris (not a native speaker).

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