Histoire des Jeux Olympiques Modernes

Nearly fifteen centuries after their creation in ancient times, the Olympic Games rose from their ashes in 1896, thanks to the dedication of one man in particular: Baron Pierre de Coubertin. Learn more about this modern undertaking in the following video.

Note: The tenses in this French article and its English translation don't match! In French, we use the present tense to describe historical stories like this to evoke a sense of immediacy, whereas in English, we commonly use the past tense - learn more about historical French tenses.

After watching the video, scroll down for the transcript in our bilingual reader, where you can click any French phrase for the English translation and related grammar lessons.

 

Q&A relating to this exercise 2 questions, 5 answers

ValC1Kwiziq community member

Just curious on the use of word ‘assistent’ in relation to 60,000 spectateurs?

Asked 1 month ago
MaartenC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor Correct answer

It is not just 'assistent', - this is 'assistent à' : "attend" or "to be present at", or "to witness" (60,000 spectators - 3rd person plural obviously). 

The French is of course in present tense for the historical writing, while the English is translated to past tense, in keeping with typical use in both languages.

 

https://www.larousse.fr/dictionnaires/francais-anglais/assister/5829

 

https://www.lawlessfrench.com/grammar/historical-tenses/

PS: the use of 'assister à' in an interview reportedly created a lot of trouble for Gerard Depardieu, when it was translated in English news articles as 'participated (assisted) at', rather than 'witnessed', in reference to a vile crime. (article in Washington Post 1991)

 

Just curious on the use of word ‘assistent’ in relation to 60,000 spectateurs?

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LucindaKwiziq community member

How do they speak so fast oh my gosh? Can so somepne please explain?

Asked 1 month ago
ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor Correct answer

Yes, I totally empathize with you. Believe it or not, after some time you won't even notice how fast they speak anymore. Just stick with it. Also, I notice you tried a C1 exercise. Try an easier level.

LucindaKwiziq community member

I dont understand

Mary AnneC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

You can adjust the playback speed.  I listened at 75%.  It helped some.  In my experience. documentary films usually have a slower pace to begin with; but not this one.  C1 is a stretch for me, but why not stretch, once in a while.

PhilipC1Kwiziq community member

I know . . .  It's so frustrating.  The French are behind the times with respect to the concept that slower speech really helps the non-native speaker.  I've expressed this to many French friends and French instructors over the years and they just refuse to concede this truth (French stubbornness I guess).  I also love how "easy French" videos and lessons are often very difficult for the beginner.  Usually, the response is "well, we want to make it authentic." 

How do they speak so fast oh my gosh? Can so somepne please explain?

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