D'où vient le nom des Schtroumpfs ?

If you were a kid (or parent) in the 80s, you undoubtedly knew the little blue creatures known as Smurfs. As odd as that name might be, the original French is even odder: les Schtroumpfs. Learn where this strange word came from in this sound file, then scroll down to the bilingual reader to check the French transcript and click any phrase for the translation and links to related grammar lessons.

Note: Some of the tenses in this French text and its English translation don't match! In French, we use the present tense to describe historical events like this to evoke a sense of immediacy, whereas in English, we commonly use the past tense - learn more about historical French tenses.

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Q&A relating to this exercise 1 question, 1 answer

DrewC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

D'où leur viennent ce nom et langage étrange

Not sure where, what, why the "leur" indirect object is in this sentence..."D'où leur viennent ce nom et langage étrange." Anyone explain? 

Asked 6 months ago
JimC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

This is "venir de" in the sense of origin of place.

"From where does their (possessive adjective) name and odd language come?"

D'où leur viennent ce nom et langage étrange

Not sure where, what, why the "leur" indirect object is in this sentence..."D'où leur viennent ce nom et langage étrange." Anyone explain? 

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