Conjugate faire in Le Subjonctif Présent (subjunctive mood)

The verb FAIRE is irregular in Le Subjonctif Présent:

 

que je fasse I do/make
que tu fasses you do/make
qu'il/elle/on fasse he/she/one does/makes
que nous fassions we do/make
que vous fassiez you do/make
qu'ils/elles fassent they do/make

Note that its root fass- is followed by the regular endings of Le Subjonctif Présent: 

-e, -es, -e, -ions, -iez, -ent

 

Look at these examples: 

Il faut que je fasse mes devoirs.
I must do my homework.

 

Je veux que tu fasses ce qu'on te dit!
I want you to do what you're told!

 

Il faut qu'elle fasse plus d'exercice.
She must do more exercise.

 

Il est important que nous fassions des efforts.
It is important for us to make an effort.

 

Elle voudrait que vous fassiez des cookies pour lundi.
She would like you to make some cookies for Monday.

 

Il faut qu'ils fassent les courses aujourd'hui.
They must go shopping today.

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Il faut qu'elle fasse plus d'exercice.
She must do more exercise.


Il faut qu'ils fassent les courses aujourd'hui.
They must go shopping today.


Je veux que tu fasses ce qu'on te dit!
I want you to do what you're told!


Il est important que nous fassions des efforts.
It is important for us to make an effort.


Il faut que je fasse mes devoirs.
I must do my homework.



Elle voudrait que vous fassiez des cookies pour lundi.
She would like you to make some cookies for Monday.


Q&A Forum 4 questions, 9 answers

Il faut que je fasse mes devoirs.

Il faut que je fasse mes devoirs. (I must do my homework.) Could this also be: Il me faut que je fasse mes devoirs? When do you use the reflexive?
Asked 1 year ago
AurélieKwiziq language super starCorrect answer

Bonjour Heather !

The "il me faut" structure can only be followed by a noun or an infinitive, whereas "il faut que" will be followed by a full clause (subject + conuugated verb).

In terms of usage, "il faut que je fasse" is more colloquial and commonly used, whereas "il me faut faire" would actually sound a bit over sophisticated.

Here are links to our two related lessons:
https://french.kwiziq.com/revision/grammar/how-to-express-necessity-or-obligation-with-the-expression-il-faut

https://french.kwiziq.com/revision/grammar/il-faut-que-is-always-followed-by-le-subjonctif-present-the-subjunctive-mood

I hope that's helpful!

Bonne journée !

It would be "Il me faut faire mes devoirs."
The two versions are very similar but saying "Il faut que je fasse mes devoirs." is more of a general statement.

But a native speaker would have to weigh in on this.

-- Chris.

Merci beaucoup Aurelie et Claus.
And I thought I was so smart to be able to avoid the subjunctive in those cases by using "Il me faut" structres. All this time I thought it sounded more childlike and instead it was the exact opposite. I guess I have to finally get that subjunctive in my head somehow. It's one of those things I just don't get.

Il faut que je fasse mes devoirs.

Il faut que je fasse mes devoirs. (I must do my homework.) Could this also be: Il me faut que je fasse mes devoirs? When do you use the reflexive?

Sign in to submit your answer

Don't have an account yet? Join today

des efforts vs un effort ... ?

I don't think this is a question pertaining to the subjunctive, however, it is something I am unsure about and which appears in this lesson. So I may as well ask here. "... fassions des efforts" - is translated as "... make an effort." But yet, "... fassiez des cookies" is translated as "... make some cookies." Why does one say "des efforts" rather than "un effort" to mean "an effort"? Thanks!!
Asked 2 years ago
AurélieKwiziq language super star
Bonjour Gabhan ! Here it's simply due to the colloquial usage of the phrase: in English, you will tend to use the singular "to make an effort", whereas in French you can use either "faire un effort" in a general way, or "faire des efforts" to emphasise the strength of the effort to be made: not just "one" effort, but several ;) I hope that's helpful! À bientôt !
Thank you!

des efforts vs un effort ... ?

I don't think this is a question pertaining to the subjunctive, however, it is something I am unsure about and which appears in this lesson. So I may as well ask here. "... fassions des efforts" - is translated as "... make an effort." But yet, "... fassiez des cookies" is translated as "... make some cookies." Why does one say "des efforts" rather than "un effort" to mean "an effort"? Thanks!!

Sign in to submit your answer

Don't have an account yet? Join today

LeeC1

ne expletif

"J'ai peur qu'elle ________ des bêtises." Why "fasse" and not "ne fasse?" Thanks.
Asked 2 years ago
AurélieKwiziq language super star
Bonjour Lee ! As stated in related lessons, the "ne" explétif can be dropped in speech, so this sentence is correct. However, "ne fasse" is also marked as a correct freeform answer. I hope that's helpful! À bientôt !

ne expletif

"J'ai peur qu'elle ________ des bêtises." Why "fasse" and not "ne fasse?" Thanks.

Sign in to submit your answer

Don't have an account yet? Join today

UmiC1

about subjunctive

I encountered this sentence: Si intelligent soit-il, il ne pourra réussir ce concours étant donné son peu de préparation. Is this another way of creating a sentence with subjunctive? Thank you very much.
Asked 2 years ago
AurélieKwiziq language super star
Bonjour Umi ! Yes indeed, the Subjunctive mood is used in a lot of different structures, expressing uncertainty or doubt. In this one, it's the hypothesis that he is clever enough, but the speaker cannot be 100% sure, hence the use of subjunctive. I hope that's helpful!
UmiC1
Dear Aurélie, Thank you very much for your response! Very helpful!!! I guessed that it was a subjective due to the usage of "soit", but I've never seen that particular "form" in the grammar books. Thank you again!!! Umi ps It is not -1 vote! It is ++1vote!!

about subjunctive

I encountered this sentence: Si intelligent soit-il, il ne pourra réussir ce concours étant donné son peu de préparation. Is this another way of creating a sentence with subjunctive? Thank you very much.

Sign in to submit your answer

Don't have an account yet? Join today

How has your day been?