Conjugate reflexive verb se laver in Le Présent (present tense)

Look at these sentences using se laver in Le Présent:

Je me lave.
I'm washing.

Tu te laves les mains?
Are you washing your hands?

Il se lave les cheveux.
He's washing his hair.

Nous nous lavons le soir.
We wash in the evenings.

Vous vous lavez tous les jours.
You wash every day.

Ils se lavent tous les matins.
They wash every morning.

In Le Présent, the 'se' part of a reflexive verb changes according to the je/tu/il/nous/vous/ils part.

See Conjugate reflexive verbs in Le Présent (present tense)

SE LAVER (to wash)

je me lave  I wash
tu te laves  you wash (singular-familiar form)
il/elle/on se lave he/she/we/one washes / people wash
nous nous lavons  we wash
vous vous lavez  you wash (plural/formal)
ils/elles se lavent  They wash
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Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Il se lave les cheveux.
He's washing his hair.


Tu te laves les mains?
Are you washing your hands?


Vous vous lavez tous les jours.
You wash every day.


Je me lave.
I'm washing.


Nous nous lavons le soir.
We wash in the evenings.



Ils se lavent tous les matins.
They wash every morning.


Q&A Forum 3 questions, 4 answers

Are there a set number of reflexive verbs, or can you make almost any verb reflexive?

Asked 2 days ago
ChrisC1Correct answer

There are verbs which you will almost exclusively use in a reflexive context. Other's may be used either reflexively or not, such as, e.g.:

J'appelle le chien. -- I'm calling the dog.
Je m'appelle Chris. -- My name is Chris.

Il arrête le moteur. -- He stops the engine.
Il s'arrête devant une vitrine. -- He stops (himself) in front of a shop window.

Marie attend son mari. -- Marie is waiting for her husband.
Marie s'attend à ce que son mari ne vienne plus. -- Marie expects that her husband won't come anymore.

Reflexive just means that the object and the subject of a verb are the same, meaning that the verb's action is performed on the subject itself. In this sense, you can make most verbs reflexive. In English one would often use "each other" or "oneself" in such a context.

Toi et moi nous parlons à notre professeur. -- You and I speak to our professor.
Il faut que nous nous parlions. -- We need to speak to each other.

I hope that helps to clarify matters somewhat.

 

CécileKwiziq language super star

Hi Claudia, 

Just to add to Chris' excellent answer, not many verbs are exclusively reflexive but 'laver' isn't one of them as you can wash your car,

(laver sa voiture).

The ones I found are:

s'envoler to fly away (bird)/to take-off ( plane)

S'évanouir = to faint

Se méfier = to mistrust

Se souvenir to remember 

But most will have a version that is not reflexive.

hope this helps!

Are there a set number of reflexive verbs, or can you make almost any verb reflexive?

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FanA1

Nous nous lavons le soir. Ils se lavent tous les matins. Why use 'le soir' not 'les soirs' in that sentence? What is the difference?

Asked 3 months ago
ChrisC1Correct answer

In French, the singular "le soir" already means "generally in the evening". You don't usually use the plural, except if you use an expression like "tous les soirs".

Je me suis lavé les mains ce soir. -- I washed my hands tonight.

Je me lave les mains le soir. -- I wash my hands at evening (meaning generally, all evenings).

Je me lave les mains tous les soirs. -- I wash my hands every evening.

Nous nous lavons le soir. Ils se lavent tous les matins. Why use 'le soir' not 'les soirs' in that sentence? What is the difference?

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MelisaA2

Stress on certain parts of a sentence.

In a lot of the French sentences on Kwiziq, the stress sounds like it is on an odd part of the sentence and I can't figure out the pattern. For example, in "Tu te laves les mains?" above, the word laves is stressed in the recording. And the voice doesn't rise at the end like I would expect for a question. Is that how the question would really be spoken in French? Is there a section here that explains which parts of a sentence are normally stressed?

Asked 6 months ago
CécileKwiziq language super starCorrect answer

Hi Melisa,

French is a syllable-timed language, where syllables take roughly the same amount of time to pronounce. 

In the sentence you mention your voice would rise at the end to indicate it is not a statement but a question.

Hope this helps!

Melisa asked:View original

Stress on certain parts of a sentence.

In a lot of the French sentences on Kwiziq, the stress sounds like it is on an odd part of the sentence and I can't figure out the pattern. For example, in "Tu te laves les mains?" above, the word laves is stressed in the recording. And the voice doesn't rise at the end like I would expect for a question. Is that how the question would really be spoken in French? Is there a section here that explains which parts of a sentence are normally stressed?

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