Expressing possession with être à

Look at these sentences expressing possession:

Cette ceinture est à eux.
This belt is theirs.  (a mixed group or male group)


C'est à qui? / À qui c'est?
Whose is it?


C'est à moi!
It's mine!


Ce sac est à lui.
This bag is his.


Ces chaussures sont à elle.
These shoes are hers.


Ces bonbons sont à elles.
These sweets are theirs (female group).

To express possession in French (It's mine, yours...), you can use the expression être à + moi/toi/lui/elle/nous/vous/eux/elles (literally it is to me/you/...)

Grammar note: in French you use the disjunctive/stress pronouns (moi/toi/lui/elle ...), whereas in English you use the possessive pronouns (mine/yours/his/hers ....)

 

See also Le mien, le tien, le sien, etc = Mine, yours, his/hers/its (possessive pronouns)
and Le nôtre, le vôtre, le leur, etc = Ours, yours, theirs (possessive pronouns)

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Ces bonbons sont à elles.
These sweets are theirs (female group).


C'est à moi!
It's mine!


Ces chaussures sont à elle.
These shoes are hers.


C'est à qui? / À qui c'est?
Whose is it?


Ce sac est à lui.
This bag is his.


Cette ceinture est à eux.
This belt is theirs.  (a mixed group or male group)


Q&A

Rob

Kwiziq community member

12 June 2018

1 reply

Pronunciation of "t" in "C'est à moi"

Why does the pronunciation accompanying this lesson not pronounce the "t" in "C'est à moi"? I have another French language program (and a French speaking daughter) which does pronounce it. Is this possibly a regional difference? Which is correct in formal Parisian French?

Cécile

Kwiziq language super star

12 June 2018

12/06/18

Hi Rob,

I have listened to the audio and can't hear the 't' .

However, both would be correct, .The 't' should be sounded but you will hear both. Children are less likely to want to be formal.

Hope this helps!

Paul

Kwiziq community member

16 November 2017

2 replies

Liaisons

In the pronunciations for this lesson there don”t appear to be any liaisons between the est and the à. For example “c’est à moi” “sont à elles” we can”t hear the letter t. Is it wrong in these cases not to liaise?

Laura

Kwiziq language super star

16 November 2017

16/11/17

Bonjour Paul,

The liaison in these examples is optional: using it would make the phrase very formal.

See optional liaisons, section 6.

Paul

Kwiziq community member

17 November 2017

17/11/17

Merci Laura. J'avais oublié que le français est une langue si espiègle! (Mais j'aime les règles optionnelles!)

Susan

Kwiziq community member

1 October 2016

2 replies

Is it as correct to say, Ce stylo est le mien, as,

Ce stylo est à moi?

Laura

Kwiziq language super star

1 October 2016

1/10/16

Bonjour Susan, "Ce stylo est le mien" is a bit awkward - "le mien" isn't used with the noun in the same clause. It's more for something like "Voilà ton stylo, et voici le mien," or else just "C'est le mien."

Susan

Kwiziq community member

1 October 2016

1/10/16

Bonjour Laura, et merci.

Stuart

Kwiziq community member

7 August 2016

1 reply

Is there an 'appropriacy' issue with 'c'est à moi' over 'c'est le miens'?

Would one be be considered more formal than the other? (If so, which one!) Thanks.

Laura

Kwiziq language super star

23 August 2016

23/08/16

Bonjour Stuart, No, there's no difference in formality, but c'est à moi is a bit more emphatic than c'est le mien.* C'est à moi is also a bit vaguer, more global, since le mien is focusing on / replacing the specific item, rather than stressing the owner. *Note that there's no s in the singular: le mien, les miens.
Clever stuff underway!