Forming the feminine of adjectives ending in -c

Masculine adjectives ending in -c do change in the feminine form.

Look at these examples:

Mon stylo blanc va avec ma jupe blanche.My white pen goes with my white skirt.

Un sourire franc est le signe d'une personne franche.A frank smile is the sign of a frank person.

Dans un jardin public, je vois une ovation publique.In a public garden, I see a public ovation.

Je connais un homme turc et une femme turque.I know a Turkish man and a Turkish woman.

Note that :

- If the -c is mute in the masculine form, then the feminine ends in -che. 

- If we hear the -c in the masculine form - i.e. a [k] sound - then the feminine becomes -que, to preserve the pronunciation.

ATTENTION: Each rule has its exceptions! 

- grec (Greek) keeps the c and add que : grecque.

Je mange un yaourt grec dans une maison grecque.I eat a Greek yogurt in a Greek house.

- sec (dry): you do hear the -c in the masculine form, and yet its feminine is sèche.

Mon manteau est sec mais ma serviette n'est pas sèche.My coat is dry but my towel is not dry.

 

Want to make sure your French sounds confident? We’ll map your knowledge and give you free lessons to focus on your gaps and mistakes. Start your Braimap today »

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Mon manteau est sec mais ma serviette n'est pas sèche.My coat is dry but my towel is not dry.
Un sourire franc est le signe d'une personne franche.A frank smile is the sign of a frank person.
Mon stylo blanc va avec ma jupe blanche.My white pen goes with my white skirt.

exception


Dans un jardin public, je vois une ovation publique.In a public garden, I see a public ovation.
Je mange un yaourt grec dans une maison grecque.I eat a Greek yogurt in a Greek house.
Je connais un homme turc et une femme turque.I know a Turkish man and a Turkish woman.
Thinking...