Chez = at someone's place (prepositions)

The preposition chez can be used with a person/name, a stress pronoun (moi, toi, lui, elle...), or with a business/profession's name (dentist,...) to mean "to or at <someone>'s place/shop/house":

Nous allons chez Marc.
We're going to Marc's place.

On se retrouvera chez Lucie.
We'll meet at Lucie's place.

Jean va chez le dentiste.
John is going to the dentist's.

Je suis chez le coiffeur.
I'm at the hairdresser's.

 

It can also be used in a more general sense to express "at home" or "in <someone's> life".

Ils sont chez eux.
They're home.

Tout va bien chez vous?
Is everything good with you?

Faites comme chez vous 
Make yourself at home

 

ATTENTION: Case of à la maison vs chez moi

When used in this context, 'maison' is closer to 'home' than literally 'house': and just as in English, you would never say "I'm going to my home", but "I'm going home", in French, you will never use "à ma maison / à ta maison...", but you will use instead the generic "à la maison".
Here, you can also use chez moi (at/to my place) as well as à la maison (at home/home):

Je rentre chez moi.
I'm going back home.

Je rentre à la maison.
I'm going home.

When talking about someone else's home, once again you cannot use à ta maison, à sa maison in French: therefore, the only solution is to use chez:

Il vient chez toi plus tard.
He's coming to your place later.

Je suis passé par chez elle ce matin.
I passed by her place this morning.

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Nous allons chez Marc.
We're going to Marc's place.


Il vient chez toi plus tard.
He's coming to your place later.


Jean va chez le dentiste.
John is going to the dentist's.



Je rentre à la maison.
I'm going home.


Je suis chez le coiffeur.
I'm at the hairdresser's.


Ils sont chez eux.
They're home.


On se retrouvera chez Lucie.
We'll meet at Lucie's place.


Je rentre chez moi.
I'm going back home.


Je suis passé par chez elle ce matin.
I passed by her place this morning.


broader sense


Faites comme chez vous 
Make yourself at home


Tout va bien chez vous?
Is everything good with you?


Q&A

Rant

Kwiziq community member

9 September 2018

1 reply

Going to my home

"and just as in English, you would never say "I'm going to my home""

I think saying "never" here is incorrect. I can think of situations when I might say this.

Laura

Kwiziq language super star

8 October 2018

8/10/18

Bonjour Rant,

Thanks for writing. I'm American and would never say "I'm going to my home." Mostly I would say "I'm going home." In rare situations, I might say "I'm going to my house," such as in response to someone offering their house instead, but I honestly cannot think of a single situation in which I'd say "I'm going to my home" - it just sounds weird.

Debra

Kwiziq community member

17 August 2018

4 replies

Regarding the question « I am going to Lucie’s house « from the lesson and the video included in the lesson, I understand chez to mean home and maison

and maison to mean house. So why is my answer nous avons à la maison incorrect in the test? The answer was chez in the test

Chris

Kwiziq community member

17 August 2018

17/08/18

Hi Debra,

"Nous avons à la maison" is grammatically incorrect, it means "We have at the house." You could say:

Nous étions à la maison. -- We were at the house. Or, as the topic suggests:
Nous étions chez nous. -- We were at our place. (can also mean "at home")

As a rough guideline, whenever you would, in English, say "at someone's place" you use "chez" in French.

"À la maison" is also in common use and means "at the house" or "at home".

Tu es où ? --  Je suis à la maison. -- Where are you? I am at the house (at home).

-- Chris.

Cécile

Kwiziq language super star

17 August 2018

17/08/18

Hi Debra,

Just to add to what Chris has just said:

Nous allons chez Lucie = I am going to Lucie's house.

I think what you were thinking of is, "Nous allons à la maison" not 'havons' which makes no sense .

You cannot in this case  say "Nous allons à la maison de Lucie" which sounds like what a very young child might say.

Hope this helps!

Tom

Kwiziq community member

17 August 2018

17/08/18

Chez is one of those wonderful Fench words that conveys a multitude of meanings.

As well as the meaning cited above (at someone's place) it also has the following uses:

of/with:  C'est une conviction fondamentale chez moi - It is a fundamental belief of mine (with me).

in (the works of): Le rôle de la socialisation chez Zola - The role of socialisation in (the works of) Zola.

among: L'hypochondrie est répandue chez les Français - Hypochondria is widespread among the French.

in (possesive pronoun) country : La réligion est sur le déclin chez nous - Religion is on the decline in our country.

There are bound to be more uses that I cannot think of.

Debra

Kwiziq community member

17 August 2018

17/08/18

Thank you everyone

Jennifer

Kwiziq community member

6 August 2017

1 reply

Se retrouver versus rencontrer?

Is there a difference in usage between se retrouver and rencontrer? I think they both mean to meet.

Ron

Kwiziq community member

8 August 2017

8/08/17

Bonjour Jennifer, Peut-être la dictionnaire Collins-Robert vous aideriez: se retrouver reciprocal reflexive verb to meet, to meet up ⇒ Ils se sont retrouvés devant le cinéma. They met up in front of the cinema. reflexive verb (= s'orienter) to find one's way around se retrouver dans qch [calculs, dossiers, désordre] to find one's way around sth (= finir) se retrouver quelque part to find o.s. somewhere, to end up somewhere se retrouver seul to find o.s. alone se retrouver sans argent to find o.s. with no money (autre locution) s'y retrouver (informal) (financièrement) to break even rencontrer (ʀɑ̃kɔ̃tʀe ) transitive verb [personne] to meet (= trouver) [mot, expression] to come across [difficultés, résistance] to meet with Il me semble que les deux sont synonymes. Bonne chance ! Ron

John

Kwiziq community member

24 August 2016

1 reply

Tout va bien chez vous

Hi - just a bit confused on this one. I noticed we have used va and not allez, but we have used vous and not toi (ie va with toi, and allez with vous). Is that because "va" is referring to "Tout" being masculine singular and not the person we are talking to? ie - can you say "tout va bien chez toi" to someone familiar or is this a fixed expression..??

Laura

Kwiziq language super star

25 August 2016

25/08/16

Bonjour John, The subject of the verb is tout - tout va bien = everything is going well. Yes, you can say tout va bien chez toi, tout va bien chez moi, tout va bien chez nous, etc. Note that if the subect were tu, the correct conjugation is vas: tu vas, il va.
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