Quand, lorsque, après que, une fois que + Le Futur Antérieur = 'when, after I've done in the future

Here is a sentence in English using 'when' to express an action that will have been completed in the future before another action:

When I have finished my work, I will watch TV.
When I finish my work, I will watch TV.

Notice how the verb after 'when' is in the Present Perfect or Present tense.


Now look at these sentences using "quand" in a similar context: 

Quand j'aurai fini mon travail, je regarderai la télé.
When I have finished my work, I'll watch TV.

Nous irons au cinéma quand nous aurons rangé notre chambre.
We'll go to the cinema when we have tidied our room.

Quand elle sera arrivée chez nous, la fête commencera.
When she's arrived at our place, the party will start.


Notice how in French you use the le Futur Antérieur after quand in order to show that this action will come before the other one. 

Note that this rule also applies to the conjunctions lorsque (when), après que (after) and une fois que (once):

Lorsque j'aurai fini mon travail, je regarderai la télé.
When I have finished my work, I'll watch TV.

Après qu'il sera arrivé, nous irons au cinéma.
After he arrives, we'll go to the cinema.

Une fois qu'elle sera arrivée chez nous, la fête commencera.
Once she arrives at our place, the party will start.

Lorsqu'elle sera arrivée chez nous, la fête commencera.
When she arrives at our place, the party will start.

 

See also previous lesson  Using Le Futur after "quand" and "pendant que" instead of Le Présent 

 

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Lorsque j'aurai fini mon travail, je regarderai la télé.
When I have finished my work, I'll watch TV.


Lorsqu'elle sera arrivée chez nous, la fête commencera.
When she arrives at our place, the party will start.


Quand elle sera arrivée chez nous, la fête commencera.
When she's arrived at our place, the party will start.


Une fois qu'elle sera arrivée chez nous, la fête commencera.
Once she arrives at our place, the party will start.


Nous irons au cinéma quand nous aurons rangé notre chambre.
We'll go to the cinema when we have tidied our room.


Après qu'il sera arrivé, nous irons au cinéma.
After he arrives, we'll go to the cinema.


Quand j'aurai fini mon travail, je regarderai la télé.
When I have finished my work, I'll watch TV.


Q&A

Jean

Kwiziq community member

28 October 2017

3 replies

Hi, help with quand v lorsque

Can you please help? I have just had « Je rentrerai lorsque il sera parti » marked as incorrect. The correct answer being « Je rentrerai quand il sera parti ». I had thought that quand and lorsque were interchangeable in this sense. Would appreciate some help.

Megan

Kwiziq community member

28 October 2017

28/10/17

I believe you are correct. I have only ever known those two words to be interchangeable.

Jean

Kwiziq community member

28 October 2017

28/10/17

Many thanks Megan. Can anyone else confirm this?

Rans

Kwiziq community member

19 June 2018

19/06/18

In this instance, quand and lorsque will both be correct. However, I think lorsque + il requires an obligatory elison to lorsqu'il and makes it slightly less accurate.


Rans (non-native learner)

Ron

Kwiziq community member

28 October 2017

3 replies

Après que + le futur antérieur or après que + l'indicatif

How does one differentiate when to use each structure? I have reread each lesson and the thoughts are unclear. Merci en avance.

Chris

Kwiziq community member

6 November 2017

6/11/17

You use the future tense when to events happen in the future, regardless of their durations. For example: "Quand je serai vieux je vivrai à la campagne." Now let's make this into a bit contrived example using le futur antérieur: "Quand j'aurai vieilli, je vivrai à la campagne."

The first example concerns two points in time: being old and living in the countryside. The second example is different: "when I will have aged" refers to the end of a process. Hence the futur antérieur.

-- Chris (not a native speaker).

Chris

Kwiziq community member

6 November 2017

6/11/17

By the way, the example given in the lesson "When I have finished my work I will watch TV". This is, in fact, improper English since in English as well one would need to use the future perfect tense: "When I'll have finished my work I'll watch TV".

-- Chris.

Sherry

Kwiziq community member

5 January 2018

5/01/18

Chris, it is proper English, at least in the U.S. I've never heard a native speaker say "when I'll have finished my work ...".

Max

Kwiziq community member

21 October 2017

1 reply

Overuse of le futur antérieur

I don't see any reason to strain for the futur antérieur when there is no change in subject. It sounds unnatural. Maybe I talk with the wrong French people.

Gruff

Kwiziq language super star

22 October 2017

22/10/17

Hi Max, I'm not sure I understood what you mean. Do you have an example of what you might say instead?

Susan

Kwiziq community member

1 September 2017

5 replies

Is the Present Perfect the same as the Futur Antérieur?

Ron

Kwiziq community member

2 September 2017

2/09/17

Bonjour Susan,
Aurélie addresses this in the opening statement on the lesson:
«Here is a sentence in English using 'when' to express an action that will have been completed in the future before another action:
When I have finished my work, I will watch TV.
When I finish my work, I will watch TV.
Notice how the verb after 'when' is in the Present Perfect or Present tense.»

I hope you find this useful.
bonne chance

Susan

Kwiziq community member

3 September 2017

3/09/17

I guess my questions is really what is the present perfect?

Ron

Kwiziq community member

3 September 2017

3/09/17

Bonjour,
From the Education First website, we have this definition of the Present Perfect tense:
"DEFINITION OF THE PRESENT PERFECT TENSE
The present perfect is used to indicate a link between the present and the past. The time of the action is before now but not specified, and we are often more interested in the result than in the action itself."
Here is an explanation of the uses of the Present Perfect tense:
"THE PRESENT PERFECT IS USED TO DESCRIBE
An action or situation that started in the past and continues in the present. I have lived in Bristol since 1984 (= and I still do.)
An action performed during a period that has not yet finished. She has been to the cinema twice this week (= and the week isn't over yet.)
A repeated action in an unspecified period between the past and now. We have visited Portugal several times.
An action that was completed in the very recent past, expressed by 'just'. I have just finished my work.
An action when the time is not important. He has read 'War and Peace'. (= the result of his reading is important)
Note: When we want to give or ask details about when, where, who, we use the simple past. Read more about choosing between the present perfect and the simple past tenses."
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I, myself, had to reread this to refresh the present perfect.
Here is the page link for this site:
http://www.ef.com/english-resources/english-grammar/present-perfect/
And here are a couple more links that address this English tense:
http://www.englishtenses.com/tenses/present_perfect
https://www.englishclub.com/grammar/verb-tenses_present-perfect.htm
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/present%20perfect
https://www.ego4u.com/en/cram-up/grammar/present-perfect-simple
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Hopefully, by reviewing these links, you will grasp a better understanding of this verb tense.
Bonne chance et bonne continuation dans vos études en français.

Susan

Kwiziq community member

3 September 2017

3/09/17

It appears that the Present Perfect is a term for English grammar. What is the french equivalent?

Ron

Kwiziq community member

3 September 2017

3/09/17

I think we have come full circle:
Notice how the verb after 'when' is in the Present Perfect or Present tense.
Quand j'aurai fini mon travail, je regarderai la télé.
When I have finished my work, I'll watch TV.
Nous irons au cinéma quand nous aurons rangé notre chambre.
We'll go to the cinema when we have tidied our room.
Quand elle sera arrivée chez nous, la fête commencera.
When she's arrived at our place, the party will start.
Notice how in French you use the le Futur Antérieur after quand in order to show that this action will come before the other one.
The French equivalent is. . . . . . . le Futur Antérieur.

Ron

Kwiziq community member

28 July 2017

1 reply

Tu viendras me voir aprés avoir mangé ton dessert.

This is the quiz question it was applicable to: Tu viendras me voir ________ ton dessert. (You'll come and see me when you've eaten your dessert.) ->quand tu auras mangé
Aside from the fact that the response does not follow the sense of the lesson, does this not express the same thought: Tu viendras me voir après avoir mangé ton dessert.?

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

9 August 2017

9/08/17

Bonjour Ron !

Tu viendras me voir quand tu auras mangé ton dessert.
Tu viendras me voir après avoir mangé ton dessert.


The meaning of these two sentences is indeed very close, just like it is in English:
You'll come and see me when you've eaten your dessert.
You'll come and see me after eating your dessert.


In our grammar exercises, we aim at testing specific structures, so we usually formulate our questions precisely as to specifically test what the lesson is about.
Though the meaning is close, these are two different sentences altogether :)

I hope that's helpful!
À bientôt !

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

17 March 2017

2 replies

Yellamaraju asked: "Is "les premiers au courant." an idiomatic expression." ?

What about "la première à le savoir"? See = "Quand j'aurais pris une décision, vous serez les premiers au courant." (When I've made a decision, you'll be the first to know.)

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

17 March 2017

17/03/17

Bonjour Yellamaraju !

Yes, it's an idiomatic way to say "to be aware of something / to know" = "être au courant".

You can also use "être le/la/les premier(s) à le savoir" which is literally "to be the first [one(s)] to know [it]".

This sentence could therefore have also been:
"Quand j'aurais pris une décision, vous serez les premiers à le savoir."

I hope that's helpful!
À bientôt !

yellamaraju

Kwiziq community member

17 March 2017

17/03/17

Yes, thank you.

Chris

Kwiziq community member

4 November 2016

2 replies

It's about le Futur and le Futur antérieur.

The English sentence is: "Marie will meet up with us when we leave the restaurant." In the answer you use le Futur antérieur: "...quand nous aurons quitté..." In English, this would, to me, rather be "...after having left...". Since here it is "...when leaving..." a more simulaneous connection is implied. Would it, hence, be ok to translate it as: 'Marie nous rejoindra quand nos quitterons le restaurant." Thanks, -- Chris.

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

4 November 2016

4/11/16

Bonjour Chris !

Here we're describing two different situations :)

In your sentence "Marie nous rejoindra quand noUs quitterons le restaurant.", the two actions are indeed simultaneous: us leaving the restaurant and her meeting us happen at the same time.
However, in the French sentence "Marie nous rejoindra quand nous aurons quitté le restaurant.", the action of leaving the restaurant will happen BEFORE Marie is meeting us.
Here "quand" is used in a sense closer to "une fois que" (once).
I think the issue here is actually the EN translation which doesn't reflect this nuance.
A better translation would probably be "Marie will meet up with us when we've left the restaurant.".
Would you agree?

Chris

Kwiziq community member

5 November 2016

5/11/16

Yes, I do understand the French side and would suggest a more precise English translation to remove ambiguity. --Chris.

ly fen

Kwiziq community member

21 April 2016

4 replies

Peut-on utiliser lorsque?

Peut-on utiliser lorsque comme "while" en anglais? Exemple : Je fais la vaisseille lorsque tu arrives" en même temps dans les 2 phrases? merci d'avance.

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

21 April 2016

21/04/16

Bonjour Ly !

"Lorsque" actually means the same as "quand" (when), so it's a bit different from "while". It doesn't mark simultaneity so much as something happening at one specific moment.
The best way to express simultaneity in this sentence would be as such:
"Je fais la vaisselle pendant que tu arrives." (I do the dishes while you're arriving.)

However, the use of "arriver" here feels a bit weird, as it is not an action that lasts as long as doing the dishes, so the simultaneity here feels a bit contrived.
Something like ""Je fais la vaisselle pendant que tu fais le lit." (I do the dishes while you're making the bed.) feels a bit more natural.

I hope that's helpful!

ly fen

Kwiziq community member

21 April 2016

21/04/16

Thank you for your answer with explanation.
So to express simultaneity, we use "pendant" it's better than " lorsque " that is used as "quand", right?

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

21 April 2016

21/04/16

Yes, "pendant que" would be "while". "Pendant" on its own means "during".

ly fen

Kwiziq community member

21 April 2016

21/04/16

Okey, I understand now, thank you very much and have a nice day!

FISEHA

Kwiziq community member

23 January 2016

1 reply

Quelle est la difference entre dans, en et pandent?

alankrita

Kwiziq community member

26 January 2016

26/01/16

Pendant Donne la duration de l'action.

Dans indiqué dans quel temps la action va commencer.

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