"Je suis entré dans le salon sans que tu ne me voies." Since the main verb is not negated, aren't you NOT supposed to use the ne explétif?

Andrea

Kwiziq community member

20 June 2018

5 replies

"Je suis entré dans le salon sans que tu ne me voies." Since the main verb is not negated, aren't you NOT supposed to use the ne explétif?

This relates to:
Entrer can be used with avoir or être in Le Passé Composé... and changes meaning -

Chris

Kwiziq community member

20 June 2018

20/06/18

Hi Andrea,


According to the Academie française, sans que doesn't require the ne explétif at all, except for higher register French and then only in a negative context. So I agree with you in this respect. Maybe Aurélie or Cécil can explain further.


Here is the link to the "ruling" of l'Academie française: http://www.academie-francaise.fr/sans-que


Il vient sans qu'on l'ait prié. -- He comes without being asked. (No ne explétif!)
Il ne vient jamais sans qu'on ne l'ait prié. -- He never comes without being asked (Ne explétif is possible but not required.)
Il ne vient jamais sans qu'on l'ait prié. -- He never comes without being asked. (No ne explétif, which is also correct.)


Greetings, -- Chris (not a native speaker).

Alan

Kwiziq community member

20 June 2018

20/06/18

Chris - you missed the most important part:


Seule la phrase Il vient sans qu’on ne l’en ait prié serait fautive.

Chris

Kwiziq community member

20 June 2018

20/06/18

Hi Alan,


I listed the three correct possibilities. The version without negation and with ne explétif is, according to l'Academie Française, incorrect. Therefore I did not list it.


Where did I go wrong?


-- Chris.

Alan

Kwiziq community member

20 June 2018

20/06/18

That's exactly the point - the version without negation but with ne explétif (which matches Andrea's example) is explicitly stated as incorrect - which is what Andrea said and I think we all agree on. I just thought that it was clearer to include this statement, rather than it merely being implied by not being one of the correct examples.

Chris

Kwiziq community member

20 June 2018

20/06/18

Gotcha, good point. Maybe the mention in the first paragraph, where I agree with Andrea, wasn't enough.


-- Chris.

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