Entrer can be used with avoir or être in Le Passé Composé... and changes meaning

Most verbs use either avoir or être as the auxiliary verb in Passé composé (or other compound tense)but entrer uses both, depending on its grammatical usage* and what it means in the sentence.
 
*Grammaphile's Corner : the technical grammatical distinction between these cases is actually whether the verb is used in a transitive or intransitive manner. 
- The transitive version (the version with a direct object) uses avoir.
- The intransitive version (lacking a direct object), uses être.
 

être + entré [en, dans, etc.]

= to go/come/get into  
= to enter

Je suis entré dans le salon sans que tu ne me voies.
I walked into the living-room without you seeing me.

Quand elle est entrée dans la salle, tous les regards se sont tournés vers elle.
When she came into the room, all eyes turned towards her.  
When she entered the room, all eyes turned towards her.

Mes filles sont entrées en CP cette année.
My daughters started Primary School this year.

 

Notice that in each case where être is the auxilliary, the verb entrer is followed by a preposition (en, sur, dans, à etc.).  
So in these cases entrer is usually about getting into, coming into, going into or entering.

See also Agreeing past participle with subject's gender and number with (+ être) verbs in Le Passé Composé.
 

avoir + entré [quelque chose] dans [quelque chose]

= to enter/put [something] into [something]

Pour accéder à ce site, j'ai entré mon mot de passe secret.
To access this website, I entered my secret password.

 
When entrer is followed immediately by a noun (as opposed to a preposition), it uses avoir as the auxiliary, like most verbs.
 
It can be very tricky to get the distinction here if you think in terms of what entrer means in English (English verbs are very often 'prepositional', meaning we say things like to go into a room as well as enter a room which are equivalent in meaning but grammatically very different - our verbs very often have prepositions where they don't in French!).
   
Here is the list of all "two-auxiliaryverbs in compound tenses:

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Je suis entré dans le salon sans que tu ne me voies.
I walked into the living-room without you seeing me.


Pour accéder à ce site, j'ai entré mon mot de passe secret.
To access this website, I entered my secret password.


Quand elle est entrée dans la salle, tous les regards se sont tournés vers elle.
When she came into the room, all eyes turned towards her.  
When she entered the room, all eyes turned towards her.


Mes filles sont entrées en CP cette année.
My daughters started Primary School this year.


Q&A Forum 7 questions, 12 answers

CaroleC1Kwiziq community member

Sur with a modifier ?

Nous ___avons_____ entré l'adresse du site sur internet.

The above sentence was part of a quiz.  Does sur not take a modifier?  Shouldn't it be sur l'internet?

Asked 1 month ago

Sur with a modifier ?

Nous ___avons_____ entré l'adresse du site sur internet.

The above sentence was part of a quiz.  Does sur not take a modifier?  Shouldn't it be sur l'internet?

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AndreaC1Kwiziq community member

"Je suis entré dans le salon sans que tu ne me voies." Since the main verb is not negated, aren't you NOT supposed to use the ne explétif?

Asked 1 year ago
ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Hi Andrea,

According to the Academie française, sans que doesn't require the ne explétif at all, except for higher register French and then only in a negative context. So I agree with you in this respect. Maybe Aurélie or Cécil can explain further.

Here is the link to the "ruling" of l'Academie française: http://www.academie-francaise.fr/sans-que

Il vient sans qu'on l'ait prié. -- He comes without being asked. (No ne explétif!)
Il ne vient jamais sans qu'on ne l'ait prié. -- He never comes without being asked (Ne explétif is possible but not required.)
Il ne vient jamais sans qu'on l'ait prié. -- He never comes without being asked. (No ne explétif, which is also correct.)

Greetings, -- Chris (not a native speaker).

AlanC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Chris - you missed the most important part:

Seule la phrase Il vient sans qu’on ne l’en ait prié serait fautive.

ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Hi Alan,

I listed the three correct possibilities. The version without negation and with ne explétif is, according to l'Academie Française, incorrect. Therefore I did not list it.

Where did I go wrong?

-- Chris.

AlanC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor
That's exactly the point - the version without negation but with ne explétif (which matches Andrea's example) is explicitly stated as incorrect - which is what Andrea said and I think we all agree on. I just thought that it was clearer to include this statement, rather than it merely being implied by not being one of the correct examples.
ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Gotcha, good point. Maybe the mention in the first paragraph, where I agree with Andrea, wasn't enough.

-- Chris.

"Je suis entré dans le salon sans que tu ne me voies." Since the main verb is not negated, aren't you NOT supposed to use the ne explétif?

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AndreaC1Kwiziq community member

"Je suis entré dans le salon sans que tu ne me voies."

Asked 1 year ago
CécileKwiziq team member

Hi Andrea, 

What is your question?

"Je suis entré dans le salon sans que tu ne me voies."

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Kristin C1Kwiziq community member

Quand elle est entrée dans la salle, tous les regards se sont tournés VERS ELLE.

so sounds like ("ver elle") as recorded? Or like ("ver zelle")( with liason)?
Asked 1 year ago
AurélieKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Bonjour Kristin !

Actually, you never do the liaison with vers : I tried lots of different cases in my head, and they all sound very weird to my native ear!

I cannot give you an explanation for it, other than the usual "...and that would be too easy!"  ;)

Bonne journée !

ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor
I believe it is "ver-z-elle". But a native speaker's input would be greatly appreciated. -- Chris (not a native speaker).

Quand elle est entrée dans la salle, tous les regards se sont tournés VERS ELLE.

so sounds like ("ver elle") as recorded? Or like ("ver zelle")( with liason)?

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MeghnaC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

No agreement with être?

In one of the quiz questions I see ´Vous êtes entré' . Why does the participle passe not agree with the plural pronouns ´Vous'?
Asked 2 years ago
AurélieKwiziq team member
Bonjour Meghna ! Here we use the "politeness" *vous*, which refers to one person, hence the agreement in the singular masculine form. Have a look at our related lesson on agreement with "être", which explains the case of "vous" in detail: Agreeing past participle with subject's gender and number with (+ être) verbs in Le Passé Composé Bonne journée !

No agreement with être?

In one of the quiz questions I see ´Vous êtes entré' . Why does the participle passe not agree with the plural pronouns ´Vous'?

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ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

I believe there is a slight inaccuracy in the English translation.

As a hint you write "The knights came in the fortified city." This actually should be "The knights came into the fortified city." meaning that the knights entered the fortified city. In my understanding, what you wrote is a colloquialism and bears a sexual connotation... -- Chris.
Asked 3 years ago
AurélieKwiziq team member
Bonjour Claus ! Indeed, this sentence does carry an extra meaning that was not intended :) Thanks to you, it has now been fixed! Merci et à bientôt !

I believe there is a slight inaccuracy in the English translation.

As a hint you write "The knights came in the fortified city." This actually should be "The knights came into the fortified city." meaning that the knights entered the fortified city. In my understanding, what you wrote is a colloquialism and bears a sexual connotation... -- Chris.

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ChiaraC1Kwiziq community member

Vous êtes entré OR vous êtes entrés?

Shouldn't it be vous êtes entrés?

Asked 3 years ago
AurélieKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Bonjour Chiara !

Thanks for your question on the site. 

I understand your confusion but here is the explanation: ''vous'' can, as you know, be used both for plural you, and for polite, formal you. 
In the second case, it has a singular meaning, as it relates to a single person.

So in le Passé Composé, when you use the formal 'vous', it will agree with the single person it refers to: it was the case here, therefore ''Vous êtes entré [...]''.

Moreover, in different contexts, you could also encounter the plural versions ''Vous êtes entrés'' or ''Vous êtes entrées'' (for a whole woman group), as well as the feminine version ''Vous êtes entrée''. 

​I hope that's helpful.

BeatriceC1Kwiziq community member
It is helpful :). Thank you

Vous êtes entré OR vous êtes entrés?

Shouldn't it be vous êtes entrés?

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