Partir vs. Sortir vs. Quitter

RobertC1Kwiziq community member

Partir vs. Sortir vs. Quitter

I think the discussion here indicates that there needs to be more explanation regarding these 3 verbs in the lesson above. As far as I can work out their use depends as much on syntax as semantics.  My notes eventually say Quitter is the only transitive verb and must have a direct object, Partir and Sortir are both intransitive, but Partir is more to get out (i.e. leave/escape) whereas Sortir is to go out and only means leave if it is used with de . Partir can be used without any object at all, I'm still not clear if Sortir requires an indirect object or can be used without.

(edit)... So I thought I had eventually cracked this, then 2 minutes after writing the above I get marked down my answer "Charles sort pour Londres" for How would you say "Charles is leaving for London." ? Apparently the answer is Partir, I am afraid the lesson fails make any clear distinction between Sortir and Partir.

Asked 1 year ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Robert, 

Thank you for your interesting comments. The difference between these verbs is difficult to grasp and difficult to explain.

In the case of 'sortir'

You could say -

Charles sort pour faire des courses = Charles is going out to go shopping, 

but you cannot use 'sortir' on its own for leaving , it has to be 'partir' -

Charles part pour Paris = Charles is leaving to go to Paris 

you could say -

Charles sort de Londres pour aller se reposer un peu = Charles leaves London to go and rest for a bit

Hope this is a bit clearer and bonne continuation!

RobertC1Kwiziq community member

Thank you Cécile

 Your answer helped me to clarify my thinking. Looking through some more questions, I think the kiwzbot is careful to use ‘coming/going out’ when it’s looking for sortir. Would I be right to assume that sortir carries a suggestion that the subject will be coming back?

I think the aide-memoir ‘sortie’ (military English  - to go out on a mission from a stronghold) is a helpful way to distinguish sortir and partir.  Do you think this makes sense?

Thanks Robertks

Partir vs. Sortir vs. Quitter

I think the discussion here indicates that there needs to be more explanation regarding these 3 verbs in the lesson above. As far as I can work out their use depends as much on syntax as semantics.  My notes eventually say Quitter is the only transitive verb and must have a direct object, Partir and Sortir are both intransitive, but Partir is more to get out (i.e. leave/escape) whereas Sortir is to go out and only means leave if it is used with de . Partir can be used without any object at all, I'm still not clear if Sortir requires an indirect object or can be used without.

(edit)... So I thought I had eventually cracked this, then 2 minutes after writing the above I get marked down my answer "Charles sort pour Londres" for How would you say "Charles is leaving for London." ? Apparently the answer is Partir, I am afraid the lesson fails make any clear distinction between Sortir and Partir.

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