Conjugate aller in Le Futur (future tense)

The verb aller in Futur Simple has an irregular stem : ir-

j'

irai

tu

iras

il / elle / on     

ira

nous

irons  

vous

irez

ils/elles

iront

To conjugate the irregular verb aller (to go) in Futur Simple, you use:

ir- + the following endings: -ai, -as, -a, -ons, -ez, -ont

Look at these examples:

J'irai en France un jour.
I will go to France one day.

Tu iras à la fête samedi?
Will you go to the party on Saturday?

Elle ira en Italie l'année prochaine.
She will go to Italy next year.

L'année prochaine, nous irons en Espagne.
Next year, we will go to Spain.

Vous irez au Japon cet été?
Will you go to Japan this summer?

Ils iront bientôt en vacances.
They will go on holidays soon.

You can also use the compound structure will go and ..., for example:

En 2500, les Hommes iront coloniser Mars.
In 2500, Men will go and colonise Mars. 

J'irai te rejoindre à la fin de l'été.
I will go and meet you at the end of the summer.

Nous irons visiter la tour Eiffel quand nous serons à Paris.
We'll go and visit the Eiffel Tower when we're in Paris.

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Elle ira en Italie l'année prochaine.
She will go to Italy next year.


Nous irons visiter la tour Eiffel quand nous serons à Paris.
We'll go and visit the Eiffel Tower when we're in Paris.


Ils iront bientôt en vacances.
They will go on holidays soon.


J'irai te rejoindre à la fin de l'été.
I will go and meet you at the end of the summer.


L'année prochaine, nous irons en Espagne.
Next year, we will go to Spain.


En 2500, les Hommes iront coloniser Mars.
In 2500, Men will go and colonise Mars. 


Tu iras à la fête samedi?
Will you go to the party on Saturday?


Vous irez au Japon cet été?
Will you go to Japan this summer?



J'irai en France un jour.
I will go to France one day.


Q&A Forum 6 questions, 12 answers

When asking question using the future tense of a verb, is inversion allowed. That's instead of saying Tu iras à la fête samedi ? Can one say iras-tu

Asked 6 months ago
TomC1Correct answer

Hi Modupe,

Yes, inversion is perfectly allowable in the future tense:

 eg: Où irons-nous pour nos vacances ?   Que ferez-vous, demain?  Quand pars-tu pour Paris ?

Hope this helps,

Tom

 

TomC1

Hi Modupe,

The third example should of course read : Quand partiras-tu pour Paris ?

Sorry,

Tom

When asking question using the future tense of a verb, is inversion allowed. That's instead of saying Tu iras à la fête samedi ? Can one say iras-tu

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This is a comment, not a question: To me, the construction "go and ... " sounds like the person speaking is poorly educated.

The "and" is superfluous to the meaning.  In my experience, I have only heard it from people (some of them my relatives, malheureusement!) who have not graduated from high school, or who are deliberately trying to sound uneducated.  Moreover, they usually slur the "and" so that it sounds like "... go 'n' visit ...  "We'll go visit the Eiffel Tower when we're in Paris" sounds just fine to my ear, much better without the "and".

Walter B. 

Asked 8 months ago
It might be different in the US, but in British English "go and visit" is correct.

Interesting!  Thank you!

Oh, well, as Winston Churchill said, Great Britain and America are two great nations divided by a common language.

I'm really enjoying the website and my French is improving rapidly!

Best regards,

Walter B.

Actually, I would also ditch the "go" for stylistic reasons: We'll visit the Eiffel Tower...
What stylistic reasons? Of course it's also a valid English sentence, and you might prefer it in some contexts (it sounds a bit like you're listing an itinerary), but as a translation of "Nous irons visiter....?
No, I mean heeding the ol' Strunk & White style manual which abhors superfluous words. The meaning doesn't change by getting rid of "... go and ..." hence these two are extraneous.

This is a comment, not a question: To me, the construction "go and ... " sounds like the person speaking is poorly educated.

The "and" is superfluous to the meaning.  In my experience, I have only heard it from people (some of them my relatives, malheureusement!) who have not graduated from high school, or who are deliberately trying to sound uneducated.  Moreover, they usually slur the "and" so that it sounds like "... go 'n' visit ...  "We'll go visit the Eiffel Tower when we're in Paris" sounds just fine to my ear, much better without the "and".

Walter B. 

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nous irons à la bibliotèque

Aurélie:  A very frivolous remark... i think you should add this translation to your possible list of answers:  “we will iron at the library!”.  Sorry I can’t help myself..some of your translations are so funny!
Asked 9 months ago
AurélieKwiziq language super star

Excellente suggestion Marnie !

I added it to one of our questions :)

Bonne journée !

nous irons à la bibliotèque

Aurélie:  A very frivolous remark... i think you should add this translation to your possible list of answers:  “we will iron at the library!”.  Sorry I can’t help myself..some of your translations are so funny!

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Ira visiter

"Nous irons visiter We'll go and visit."

I would translate this to English as "We'll go to visit." Would that also be "Nous irons visiter " in French. 

Asked 1 year ago
CécileKwiziq language super starCorrect answer

Hi Paul,

"Nous irons visiter le Louvre et Le Musée d'Orsay la semaine prochaine", can be "We'll go and/to visit the Louvre and the Orsay Museums next week".

Or "Nous irons rendre visite à mes parents en même temps" is, "We'll go and/to visit my parents at the same time".

N.B.

Visiter for, to visit/to look around places of interest

Rendre visite à quelqu'un for, to visit people.

Hope this helps! 

 

Thanks for your explanation Cécile. I was having trouble with the translation of "aller+(verb infinitive)" into "go and (verb infinitive)", whereas "aller+(verb infinitive)" makes perfect sense to me as "go to (verb infinitive)". Maybe it depends on where one learnt English.

Ira visiter

"Nous irons visiter We'll go and visit."

I would translate this to English as "We'll go to visit." Would that also be "Nous irons visiter " in French. 

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On as per nous or as per il/elle?

Asked 2 years ago
Please ignore the above I was having a moment. Tried to delete but apparently can't

On as per nous or as per il/elle?

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Why is it en France, en Espagne, en Italie but AU Japan? S'il vous plait

Asked 3 years ago
StuartC1Correct answer
Because you use "en" with feminine countries and "au" with masculine countries. I had learned in high school French that you use "au" with the state I live in, Texas. Most countries that end in "e" are feminine, but there are exceptions such as Mexique, Belize, Mozambique, Cambodge which are all masculine.

Why is it en France, en Espagne, en Italie but AU Japan? S'il vous plait

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Let me take a look at that...