Conjugate reflexive verb se lever in Le Présent (present tense)

Here is how to conjugate se lever (to get up) in Le Présent:

SE LEVER (to get up)

je me lève I get up
tu te lèves you get up (singular-familiar form)
il/elle/on se lève he/she/we/one gets up / people get up
nous nous levons  we get up
vous vous levez you get up (plural/formal form)
ils/elles se lèvent They get up

ATTENTION:

For the pronouns "je/tu/il/elle/on/ils/elles", lever takes an accent on the first 'e' : è
See also Conjugate -é(-)er, -e(-)er verbs in Le Présent (except -eter and -eler)

In Le Présent, the 'se' part of a reflexive verb changes according to the je/tu/il/nous/vous/ils part.

See Conjugate reflexive verbs in Le Présent (present tense)


Here are examples to listen to:

Je me lève à 8 heures.
I get up at 8.

Tu te lèves à quelle heure d'habitude ?
At what time do you get up usually?

Le soleil se lève à l'est.
The sun rises in the East.

Nous nous levons avant les enfants.
We get up before the children.

À quelle heure vous vous levez?
What time do you get up?

Ils ne se lèvent jamais après 8 heures.
They never get up after 8.

 

 

Examples and resources

Nous nous levons avant les enfants.
We get up before the children.


Je me lève à 8 heures.
I get up at 8.


Tu te lèves à quelle heure d'habitude ?
At what time do you get up usually?


Le soleil se lève à l'est.
The sun rises in the East.


Ils ne se lèvent jamais après 8 heures.
They never get up after 8.



À quelle heure vous vous levez?
What time do you get up?


Q&A Forum 4 questions, 9 answers

Relflexive verb: se moquer

The example verbs in the lesson (se lever) and most of the ones presented in the tests (se coucher, se laver, se réveiller) all follow the same pattern-- in that the action is done on/to the subject or the subject own body.  However, with the verb se moquer the action is done to someone else and requires the use of "de".    

It's unclear why one wouldn't say  "Ils me moquent" instead of "Ils se moque de moi".  Can some explain this a bit?

Asked 2 months ago
CécileKwiziq language super starCorrect answer

Hi Alvin,

There are multiple examples of reflexive verbs in French which do not follow the model - to oneself, or to each other and some are followed by the preposition 'de' as in the case of -

Se moquer de 

e.g.

se souvenir de ( to remember something/someone)s'occuper de ( to look after someone/something), se passer de ( to do without something/someone), etc.

Elle s'occupe de moi = She is looking after me 

On se passe bien d'elle We do very well without her

Je me souviens de sa mère = I remember her mother 

The pronouns which are used after 'de' will be the same as the ones after 'chez' in the following Kwiziq lesson-

https://french.kwiziq.com/revision/grammar/common-uses-of-moi-toi-lui-elle-nous-vous-eux-elles-disjunctivestress-pronouns

Hope this helps!

 

Because the phrase is: se moquer de quelqu' un.

Relflexive verb: se moquer

The example verbs in the lesson (se lever) and most of the ones presented in the tests (se coucher, se laver, se réveiller) all follow the same pattern-- in that the action is done on/to the subject or the subject own body.  However, with the verb se moquer the action is done to someone else and requires the use of "de".    

It's unclear why one wouldn't say  "Ils me moquent" instead of "Ils se moque de moi".  Can some explain this a bit?

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Present continuous

I don't see any example with the present continuous, but I guess it's the same here as it is with other verbs, correct? "I'm getting up to go to work" can be translated to "Je me lève pour aller au travail"?
Asked 2 years ago
RonC1
Bonjour David, The short answer is yes, whether the verb is regular or reflexive. Here is an excerpt from the lesson that covers this: Notice that in French you use Le Présent to describe actions that are ongoing in the present, whereas in English we would use the Present Continuous tense for these actions (as opposed to the Present Tense). Note: There is no equivalent of the Present Continuous tense in French, so you cannot, for example, translate 'I am working' as "Je suis travaillant". Use "je travaille". --- the link for the lesson follows: Using Le Présent for ongoing actions where English uses Present Continuous Bonne chance.
Merci beaucoup, RON. I saw afterwards that the lesson about reflexive verbs contains multiple examples of (english) Present Continuous. I'll leave here a link to that lesson as well: Conjugate reflexive verbs in Le Présent (present tense)
RonC1
Votre lien est un très bon exemple concret .

Present continuous

I don't see any example with the present continuous, but I guess it's the same here as it is with other verbs, correct? "I'm getting up to go to work" can be translated to "Je me lève pour aller au travail"?

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me lève

I think "je me lève" should be translated as both "i wake up" and "i get up". Why do you consider "i wake up" as wrong answer?
Asked 2 years ago
AurélieKwiziq language super star
Bonjour Saptarshi ! Simply because "to wake up" is expressed with another verb in French = "se réveiller". "Je me réveille à sept heures, je lis un peu, et je me lève à sept heures et quart." (I wake up at seven, I read a bit, and I get up at quarter past seven.) I hope that's helpful! À bientôt !
Merci Aurélie pour votre réponse!

me lève

I think "je me lève" should be translated as both "i wake up" and "i get up". Why do you consider "i wake up" as wrong answer?

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I think the first example sentence has sth wrong

It should be "Le soleil se lève à l'est." Is that right?
Asked 2 years ago
AurélieKwiziq language super star
Bonjour Clarice ! Thank you so much for letting us know: it was quite bad indeed :) It's now been fixed ! Bonne journée !
Merci:) I love lawless french which has so many french lovers interacting with each other. And I appreciate you guys' work.

I think the first example sentence has sth wrong

It should be "Le soleil se lève à l'est." Is that right?

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