Conjugate regular -er verbs (+ avoir) in Le Passé Composé (conversational past)

See how to conjugate regular -ER verbs in Le Passé Composé with the example of voler (to fly):

 

REGULAR -ER VERB 
VOLER to fly

j'

ai volé
I flew

tu

as volé
you flew

il / elle / on

volé
he / she / one flew

nous

avons volé
we flew

vous

avez volé
you flew

ils/elles

ont volé
they flew

Regular -ER verbs are easy to conjugate in Le Passé Composé :  

avoir in Le Présent + past participle

To form the past participle of regular -er verbs, simply replace the -er ending of the infinitive form with :

manger (to eat) -> mangé  (eaten)
danser (to dance) -> dansé  (danced)
parler (to speak) -> parlé  (spoken)
etc

ATTENTION: 

Note that with avoir as an auxiliary, past participles never agree with the subject of the verb:

Il a parlé à Marie.
He spoke to Marie.

Elle a parlé à Marie.
She spoke to Marie.

 

Here are more examples to listen to:

J'ai mangé un sandwich.
I ate a sandwich.

Tu as parlé à ta mère.
You spoke to your mother.

Il a commandé un dessert.
He ordered a dessert.

Nous avons chanté tous ensemble.
We all sang together.

Vous avez écouté de la musique.
You listened to music.

Ils ont discuté toute la nuit.
They discussed all night long.


 

See also how to conjugate the irregular ALLER in Le Passé Composé
Conjugate coming and going verbs (+ être) in Le Passé Composé (conversational past)
and other regular verbs:
Conjugate regular -ir verbs (+ avoir) in Le Passé Composé (conversational past)
Conjugate regular -dre verbs (+ avoir) in Le Passé Composé (conversational past)

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources


Elle a parlé à Marie.
She spoke to Marie.


Tu as parlé à ta mère.
You spoke to your mother.


Il a parlé à Marie.
He spoke to Marie.


J'ai mangé un sandwich.
I ate a sandwich.


Vous avez écouté de la musique.
You listened to music.


Ils ont discuté toute la nuit.
They discussed all night long.


Nous avons chanté tous ensemble.
We all sang together.



Il a commandé un dessert.
He ordered a dessert.


Q&A

helen

Kwiziq community member

2 August 2018

3 replies

Don't know why this isn't imparfait

où on a degouté des specialities lyonnaises/ où on dégoutait des specialities lyonnaises (where we enjoyed Lyonnaise specialities)

I don't understand why this can't be in the imparfait as there's no end time. Is it passé composé because it is NOW finished?  It seems like this is something that happened over a period of time in the past, not quickly, so I used imparfait.

Chris

Kwiziq community member

3 August 2018

3/08/18

Hi Helen,

would you say, in English, "...where we used to sample Lyonnese specialites"? Or would it not rather be, "...where we samples Lyonnese specialties"? If the latter, then you use the passé composé in English.

-- Chris.

helen

Kwiziq community member

3 August 2018

3/08/18

Hey, Chris-- so is that a trick to use when deciding on the imparfait vs passé composé to think... "I, we, etc. used to + imparfait". That helps a lot if that's the case because so many times I'm deciding between which tense to use about something in the past and it's not clear cut because there's no definite end time.  Thank you.

Chris

Kwiziq community member

3 August 2018

3/08/18

The French imparfait describes a longer lasting or usual action in the past. Like you were describing a scene in front of which an action took place (the action is in passé composé). 

In English you would use constructs like the continuous past tense:

I was going to school when I met you. -- J'allais à l'école quand je t'ai rencontré. 

But the same sentence could also mean "I used to go to school..."' expressing something that happened as a habit in the past. 

J'allais à l'école avec mes potes.  -- I used to go to school with my buddies.

With these two crutches you should be well kn your way of figuring out the imparfait. 

-- Chris. 

sidney

Kwiziq community member

4 October 2016

3 replies

why is barking "all night long" not in the imperfect?

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

4 October 2016

4/10/16

Bonjour Sydney ! Both Le Passé Composé and L'Imparfait could be used here, depending on your point of view. If you say "Le chien a aboyé toute la nuit." (The dog barked all night long), it means you're talking of it as a past and finished action. If you said "Le chien aboyait toute la nuit" (The dog was barking all night long), you're insisting on the length of this action, by highlighting the continued aspect of this process. You could also use it to express a habit in the past (The dog used to bark all night long). I hope that's helpful! À bientôt !

Michael

Kwiziq community member

21 January 2018

21/01/18

In english we have something similar, if I am understanding correctly. We would say the dog kept barking all night to stress the continuous nature. If we said the dog barked all night its either he did it continuously or intermittantly, so often a clarification is required.

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

25 January 2018

25/01/18

Yes, that's the tricky part with using the Simple Past in English there :)
Getting that for you now.