Faire confiance (à) = To trust

Look at these sentences expressing trust in French:

Je fais confiance à mes amis.
I trust my friends.

Sarah ne faisait pas confiance à Thomas.
Sarah didn't use to trust Thomas.

Nous ne faisons pas confiance à cet homme.
We don't trust this man.

 

Note that to express trust in French, you use the expression faire confiance à (literally: to make trust to).

Note also that when using this expression with object pronouns me/te/lui/nous/vous/leur (I trust you, him, them...), you place the pronoun before faire.

Je lui fais complètement confiance.
I trust him/her completely.

Tu ne devrais pas leur faire confiance.
You shouldn't trust them.

Je te fais confiance.
I trust you.

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Je lui fais complètement confiance.
I trust him/her completely.


Nous ne faisons pas confiance à cet homme.
We don't trust this man.


Tu ne devrais pas leur faire confiance.
You shouldn't trust them.


Je te fais confiance.
I trust you.


Sarah ne faisait pas confiance à Thomas.
Sarah didn't use to trust Thomas.


Je fais confiance à mes amis.
I trust my friends.


Q&A Forum 8 questions, 12 answers

JinnB1Kwiziq community member

Sarah ne faisait pas confiance à Thomas.

Does this sentence imply that Sarah trusts Thomas now? If I hear someone say 'Sarah does not use to trust Thomas.' in English, I would think that she trusts him now. Not sure about it in French. 

Asked 6 months ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Jinn,

I would understand that because of the use of the imparfait that -

Sarah did not trust Thomas at that time

but there's not enough context to know if the situation has changed or not.

ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

From that statement, devoid of context and as it stands now, it is difficult to infer anything about the present.

Sarah ne faisait pas confiance à Thomas.

Does this sentence imply that Sarah trusts Thomas now? If I hear someone say 'Sarah does not use to trust Thomas.' in English, I would think that she trusts him now. Not sure about it in French. 

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CarolB2Kwiziq community member

I'm confused by: "Tu ne devrais pas leur faire confiance." In the present, wouldn't it be "Tu ne dois pas leur faire confiance.", that is:

You must not / shouldn't trust them.  So what does using the imparfait do, and how is the meaning using devrais different from using dois?
Asked 11 months ago
ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Hi Carol, devrais is not the imperfect, it is actually present tense but present tense conditional.

devrais -- you should

The imperfect would be similar but without the "r": devais.

CarolB2Kwiziq community member
Thanks!! I don't know conditional yet, no wonder I was confused.

I'm confused by: "Tu ne devrais pas leur faire confiance." In the present, wouldn't it be "Tu ne dois pas leur faire confiance.", that is:

You must not / shouldn't trust them.  So what does using the imparfait do, and how is the meaning using devrais different from using dois?

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MichaelC1Kwiziq community member

I trust my friends completely = Je fais completement confiance a mes amis OR Je fais confiance a mes amis completement???

Is the pronoun placed before Faire ONLY with an Object pronoun??
Asked 11 months ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Michael,

"Je fais complètement confiance à mes amis." 

is correct

and 

"Je leur fais complètement confiance."

Hope this helps!

MichaelC1Kwiziq community member
Merci bien.

I trust my friends completely = Je fais completement confiance a mes amis OR Je fais confiance a mes amis completement???

Is the pronoun placed before Faire ONLY with an Object pronoun??

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MichaelC1Kwiziq community member

I trust my friends completely = Je fais completement confiance a mes amis OR Je fais confiance a mes amis completement???

Is the pronoun placed before Faire ONLY with an Object pronoun??
Asked 11 months ago

I trust my friends completely = Je fais completement confiance a mes amis OR Je fais confiance a mes amis completement???

Is the pronoun placed before Faire ONLY with an Object pronoun??

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JohnB2Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Include other forms

I feel this lesson should include or at least link to other forms like fais-moi confiance or ne lui fais pas confiance. Trust no one! Don't trust your friends! I think we use those more.
Asked 1 year ago
CécileKwiziq team member

Hi John,

Do you mean adding some examples in the Imperative?

Include other forms

I feel this lesson should include or at least link to other forms like fais-moi confiance or ne lui fais pas confiance. Trust no one! Don't trust your friends! I think we use those more.

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NicholasC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

"Tu fais confiance à moi" is wrong? How so?

Asked 2 years ago
AurélieKwiziq team member
Bonjour Nicholas ! In the case of indirect objects - complements to the verb introduced by a preposition "à" or "de" - following the pattern "à + stress pronoun", in French they need to be replaced altogether by indirect object pronouns: "me, te, lui, nous, vous, leur". Here are links to our related lessons: Me, te, nous, vous = Me, you, us, you (direct and indirect object pronouns) Replacing people with lui, leur = him, her, them (indirect object pronouns) I hope that's helpful! À bientôt !

"Tu fais confiance à moi" is wrong? How so?

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StevieC1Kwiziq community member

"Sarah didn't use to trust ..." is poor English.

The correct form is "Sarah used not to trust ...".
Asked 2 years ago
StevieC1Kwiziq community member
... though I appreciate that not many people form their sentences so elegantly :)
DebraB2Kwiziq community member
Yes your correct form is correct and circumvents the raging arguments between the other informal ways. But this grammar is changing especially in spoken language. News presenters now say different to, different than, etc. And the lines between less and fewer are use to getting more blurrier every day and I can't get useta that.

"Sarah didn't use to trust ..." is poor English.

The correct form is "Sarah used not to trust ...".

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SteveC1Kwiziq community member

The translation for the third item should read... Sarah didn't used to trust Thomas

Asked 3 years ago
LauraKwiziq team member
Bonjour Steve, Thanks for your comment, but you're mistaken. "Didn't" is already in the past tense, so must be followed by the base form of the verb "use," just as we say "didn't want" and "didn't like" and not xx"didn't wanted"xx and xx"didn't liked"xx
SandraB2Kwiziq community member
I am no grammarian, but use and used to in my mind don't mean the same thing and aren't pronounced the same way with "ed" at the end, depending on usage. We don't "use trust", we trust. Used to is past tense in my mind. Use is a verb for utility, like I use a knife to cut. Or I used a knife yesterday. But it's pronounced differently to show past tense, not utility. I used to trust Thomas. or I didn't used to trust Thomas, but now I do. Strange sounding to my ear. Guess I am wrong by rules of grammar!

The translation for the third item should read... Sarah didn't used to trust Thomas

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