Notre, nos, votre, vos, leur, leurs = our, your, their (possessive adjectives)

Look at these examples:

Ils aiment leurs parents.
They love their parents.

Nous promenons notre chien.
We walk our dog.

Vous faites vos devoirs.
You do your homework.

Pouvez-vous apporter vos chaussures, s'il-vous-plaît?
Can you bring your shoes please?

Vous avez passé votre examen.
You took your exam.

Nous avons nos passeports.
We have our passports.

Notice that to express our, your and their, you use the possessive adjectives notre/nos, votre/vos, leur/leurs, as following:

 

  Singular Plural
our notre
nos
your (vous) votre
vos
their leur
leurs

Note the similarity of the forms.


IMPORTANT: The first letter is determined by the owner (n =our; v =your, l =their) etc. but the rest of the adjective is related to the number of the thing that is possessed.

More Possessive Adjectives

Mon, ma, mes; ton, ta, tes; son, sa, ses = my; your; his / her (possessive adjectives)

and also the more advanced

Common mistakes with mon/ma/mes, ton/ta/tes and son/sa/ses (possessive adjectives)

Using "mon" rather than "ma" with feminine nouns starting with a vowel or mute h (possessive adjectives)

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Vous avez passé votre examen.
You took your exam.


Nous promenons notre chien.
We walk our dog.


Pouvez-vous apporter vos chaussures, s'il-vous-plaît?
Can you bring your shoes please?


Vous faites vos devoirs.
You do your homework.



Vive le vent, vive le vent,
Vive le vent d'hiver,
Qui rapporte aux vieux enfants,
Leurs souvenirs d'hier, oh !

Long live the wind, long live the wind,
Long live the winter wind,
Which brings to old kids,
Their memories of yesterday, oh!


Nous avons nos passeports.
We have our passports.


Ils aiment leurs parents.
They love their parents.


Q&A Forum 6 questions, 11 answers

do collective nouns take plural possessive pronouns

Asked 3 months ago
CécileKwiziq language super starCorrect answer

Hi Helen,

Normally a collective noun is treated as singular in grammatical terms so you will say -

La police arrive avec ses renforts .

L'équipe a partagé son expérience avec nous.

La famille a dû attendre trois heures avant d'embarquer.

Hope this helps!

 

do collective nouns take plural possessive pronouns

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Vous avez passé votre examen

"Vous avez passé votre examen" according to google translate (and my intiution) means Vous avez passé votre examen.

But here it says: "You took your exam".

Asked 7 months ago
ChrisC1Correct answer

Yes. Strictly speaking,

Vous avez passé votre examen means you took  the exam, and

Vous avez eu votre examen is you passed it.

In practice, and according to two native speakers I am in touch with, that distinction is lost in practice.

I am certain from several French teachers that "passer" is used to mean taking a test.  I am told to pass a test in the English sense of pass is "reussir," to succeed.  So the French equivalent of "You passed your test" is "Tu as reussi ton examen."  (I can't type the accents on the e in reussir). 

Vous avez passé votre examen

"Vous avez passé votre examen" according to google translate (and my intiution) means Vous avez passé votre examen.

But here it says: "You took your exam".

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which possessive adjectives is suitable for singulier,plurier,femininmet masculin

Asked 9 months ago

which possessive adjectives is suitable for singulier,plurier,femininmet masculin

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Definite articles for parts of the body

Having read the lesson about using the definite article when referring to parts of the body, why does the idiom for "taking to one's heels" translate as "nous avons pris nos jambes à notre cou"? as in the practice lesson "la main dans le sac" posted on Facebook recently.
Asked 2 years ago
GruffKwiziq language super star
Hi Annie - when referring to a person's own body parts in French, you would usually use the definite article but there are some exceptions: Using mon, ma, mes, etc with parts of the body (possessive adjectives)">Using mon, ma, mes, etc with parts of the body (possessive adjectives)">Using mon, ma, mes, etc with parts of the body (possessive adjectives)">Using mon, ma, mes, etc with parts of the body (possessive adjectives)

Hope that helps!
Merci, ça devient plus clair pour moi maintenant.

Definite articles for parts of the body

Having read the lesson about using the definite article when referring to parts of the body, why does the idiom for "taking to one's heels" translate as "nous avons pris nos jambes à notre cou"? as in the practice lesson "la main dans le sac" posted on Facebook recently.

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Is there a liaison, pronouncing, "ils aiment leurs parents?"

Asked 3 years ago
AurélieKwiziq language super star
Bonjour Susan ! Yes, there is one liaison between "ils" and "aiment", as such: [illzM] :) I hope that's helpful!
It is - and it leads to another question: are there rules or conventions? I notice differences sometimes between Kwiziq voice files and those on the videos.
AurélieKwiziq language super star
Yes, we're trying really hard for our audio files pronunciation to be accurate, but sometimes it's not so. Please let me know whenever you encounter an audio file which seems to miss liaisons etc, as we're aiming to make them as accurate as possible :)
Will do. Merci.

Is there a liaison, pronouncing, "ils aiment leurs parents?"

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SueA1

So one says

Elle aime ses parents. Ils aiment leurs parents Ils aiment leur père.
Asked 3 years ago
AurélieKwiziq language super star
Exactement Sue ! Bravo, c'est parfait !

So one says

Elle aime ses parents. Ils aiment leurs parents Ils aiment leur père.

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