Aimer que / détester que + Le Subjonctif = to like / hate that

Look at these expressions of like and dislike:

J'aime que tu sois si attentif.
I like that you are so attentive.

Elle déteste qu'il prenne son temps quand elle est en retard.
She hates that he takes his time when she's late.

Nous ne détestons pas que vous nous apportiez le petit-déjeuner au lit.
We don't dislike that you bring us breakfast in bed.

La maîtresse n'aime pas que les élèves ne fassent pas attention.
The teacher doesn't like that the pupils don't pay attention.

Nous détesterions qu'il disparaisse ...
We would hate for him to disappear ...

J'aimerais que tu sois plus gentil avec ma mère.
I would like you to be nicer with my mother.


Note that aimer que and détester que are followed by Subjonctif, in BOTH affirmative and negative sentences.

 

ATTENTION:

This is in contrast to expressions of opinion in French (penser que, trouver que, savoir que, croire que) which are only followed by the Subjonctif when used in the negative form but the Indicatif when used in the affirmative form.
Using Le Subjonctif after penser, trouver. savoir, croire, prétendre + que in the negative

 

See also how to conjugate in Le Subjonctif: 
Conjugate regular verbs in Le Subjonctif Présent (subjunctive mood)
Conjugate être in Le Subjonctif Présent (subjunctive mood)
Conjugate faire in Le Subjonctif Présent (subjunctive mood)
Conjugate pouvoir in Le Subjonctif Présent (subjunctive mood)
Conjugate prendre and derivatives in Le Subjonctif Présent (subjunctive mood)
Conjugate savoir in Le Subjonctif Présent (subjunctive mood) 
Conjugate avoir in Le Subjonctif Présent (subjunctive mood)

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Nous détesterions qu'il disparaisse ...
We would hate for him to disappear ...


Nous ne détestons pas que vous nous apportiez le petit-déjeuner au lit.
We don't dislike that you bring us breakfast in bed.


J'aimerais que tu sois plus gentil avec ma mère.
I would like you to be nicer with my mother.


Elle déteste qu'il prenne son temps quand elle est en retard.
She hates that he takes his time when she's late.


Mon patron n'aime pas que je sois souvent en retard.
My boss doesn't like that I am often late.


J'aime que tu sois si attentif.
I like that you are so attentive.


Tu aimes que j'aie acheté cette robe?
You like that I bought that dress?


La maîtresse n'aime pas que les élèves ne fassent pas attention.
The teacher doesn't like that the pupils don't pay attention.


Q&A

Lisa

Kwiziq community member

26 September 2017

6 replies

"Nous aimons que tu sois à l'heure."

Lisa

Kwiziq community member

26 September 2017

26/09/17

Sorry, my question didn't actually come through, only the title. Trying again: If "Nous aimons que tu sois à l'heure." is "We like that you're on time." Would it be correct to say "Nous t'aimerions être à l'heure." for "We would like you to be on time." ? Merci beaucoup.

Ron

Kwiziq community member

26 September 2017

26/09/17

Bonjour Lisa,
There are two verbs that could be used to say this:
Nous aimerions que vous soyez à l'heure.
Nous souhaitons que vous soyez à l’heure.
Note that the first phrase the verb aimer is in le conditionnel; while the second phrase souhaiter is in l'indicatif. However, être is conjugated in le subjonctif in the clause of both sentences.

J'espère que ma réponse vous aiderait.
Bonne chance et bonne continuation dans vos études en français, la langue de Molière et qui a été utilisé par le monde français depuis l’époque d’Hugues Capet

Lisa

Kwiziq community member

27 September 2017

27/09/17

Merci pour l'aide, Ron. J'ai réalisé ce soir que je devrais utiliser "que" dans la phrase. C'est bon que je ne parle pas souvent avec ceux qui parlent français, parce que suis lente à me souvenir de bons mots!

Ron

Kwiziq community member

27 September 2017

27/09/17

I fully understand. One thing to keep in mind is that speaking French is not a race or a competition. You sound like me in that respect. I finally realized that the only pressure I was sensing to speak quicker was coming from inside me.
Since you do not say where you live, I don't know what resources in the community you have, but the single best thing that you can do to augment your speaking ability is to find and join a French conversation class. If there is an Alliance Française in your area, they have great classes. If not, perhaps a college or university close at hand has non-credit courses that offer such a thing. Alternatively, private lessons with a native french-speaking person would do the trick too; however, this option may be the most expensive.
Bonne chance et je suis très ravi que j'avais pu de vous aider.

Chris

Kwiziq community member

6 November 2017

6/11/17

"Nous t'aimerions être à l'heure" would be a literal translation of the English way to say this. It would, however, be wrong in French. Ron already explained the correct form to express this. I just wanted to respond specifically to the example you gave.

-- Chris (not a native speaker).

Ron

Kwiziq community member

6 November 2017

6/11/17

Bonjour Chris,
I really enjoy reading your input too. You have given me a lot more knowledge that I was unaware of.
SVP, keep up the good work.

Ron

K

Kwiziq community member

31 July 2017

2 replies

I have the same question about haïr. Why is it wrong? Thanks. K

Ron

Kwiziq community member

8 August 2017

8/08/17

Bonjour K,
Here is a link to the «Subjunctivisor» on this site. I searched it and was unable to locate haïr as a verb that needs the subjunctive; however, Aurèlie gave a response that indicates yes:
«The answer is yes: haïr is a synonym of détester, though less commonly used nowadays, and just like détester, will be followed by Le Subjonctif:
Je hais que tu sois si parfait !
I hate that you are so perfect! »

Bonne chance !
Ron

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

9 August 2017

9/08/17

Bonjour K !

You are right: "haïr" and "détester" are indeed synonyms in this context.

Thanks to you, I've now updated the question to accept this alternate correct answer:
"Nous ne haïssons pas qu'elle soit là."

Merci et à bientôt !

Jennifer

Kwiziq community member

2 July 2017

6 replies

Can the verb haïr be used insteadof détester and if so would it take the subjunctive?

Ron

Kwiziq community member

2 July 2017

2/07/17

Bonjour Jennifer, Here is a link to the «Subjunctivisor» on this site. I searched it and was unable to locate haïr as a verb that needs the subjunctive. Bonne chance.

Andy

Kwiziq community member

2 July 2017

2/07/17

Hi Jennifer,
As far as I can see the verb haïr would (in theory) trigger the subjective, given that it's a strong expression of opinion or judgement. But, and this is a big but, quite simply it is never used in french to express "I hate that [something is the case]." In this case "détester que" remains the correct construction.

Jennifer

Kwiziq community member

2 July 2017

2/07/17

Thank you both. I looked up larrousse and I think it seems to take de plus an infinitive. Not sure concentration going will look again later.

Andy

Kwiziq community member

2 July 2017

2/07/17

Further research shows you're right. It can be used in such a construction and yes it does take the subjunctive: Haïr que (+ subjonctif) : il hait que l'on arrive en retard.

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

6 July 2017

6/07/17

Bonjour Jennifer !

The answer is yes: haïr is a synonym of détester, though less commonly used nowadays, and just like détester, will be followed by Le Subjonctif:

Je hais que tu sois si parfait !

I hate that you are so perfect!

I hope that's helpful!
À bientôt !

Catriona

Kwiziq community member

9 January 2018

9/01/18

Just to let you know, Aurélie, haïr is still being marked as wrong.

Joakim

Kwiziq community member

12 March 2017

1 reply

Why subjunctive?

The subjunctive tens is associated with fear/doubt/uncertainty. So why is it used with "aimer que" ?

Gruff

Kwiziq language super star

12 March 2017

12/03/17

Hi Joakim - it's also used to express wishes/hypothetical futures. This is the same in English in fact: "I would like that you be there on time."

You can read more about it here:
https://french.kwiziq.com/my-languages/french/glossary/74

Hope that helps!

Johnny

Kwiziq community member

12 September 2016

2 replies

What's about the things we like in the past?

What if the thing we like or dislike happens in the past? For example, I hate that you gave her the money or I like that you helped that old lady.

Laura

Kwiziq language super star

12 September 2016

12/09/16

Bonjour Johnny,

Then you need the past subjunctive:

Je déteste que tu lui aies donné l'argent.

Jennifer

Kwiziq community member

5 June 2017

5/06/17

Can the haïr be used in this example instead of détester que?
Let me take a look at that...