Plus... plus..., moins... moins... = the more...the more..., the less...the less... (comparisons with phrases)

Look at these comparisons:

Plus je regarde la télévision, plus je la déteste
The more I watch television, the more I hate it.

Plus tu es beau, plus la vie est facile.
The more beautiful you are, the easier life is

Moins je dors, moins j'en ai besoin
The less I sleep, the less I need to

Plus j'écoute, moins je l'aime
The more I listen, the less I like it

 

Notice that expressions like the more X the more Y are similar in French, but the definite article (the) doesn't make an appearance.

Note also that in French you keep the order of the sentence intact, unlike English where you put the adjective after more for example, The more anxious you are...

Plus nous sommes généreux, plus les gens nous le rendront.
The more generous we are, the more people will give back to us.

See also Better and better, worse and worse = de mieux en mieux, de pire en pire (comparisons)De plus en plus and de moins en moins = more and more and less and less (comparisons with adjectives, adverbs, verbs) and De plus en plus de and de moins en moins de = more and more and less and less (comparisons of nouns)

Here are other Comparative structures:

Making comparisons with adjectives: plus... que, aussi... que, moins... que
Making comparisons with adverbs: plus... que, aussi... que, moins... que
Making comparisons with verbs: plus que, autant que, moins que
Making comparisons with nouns: plus de... que, moins de... que, autant de... que

And Superlative structures:

Le, la, les plus and le, la, les moins = the most and the least (superlatives of adjectives)
Le plus and le moins = the most and the least (superlative of adverbs)
Forming the superlative of adjectives in complex cases
Meilleur, mieux, pire / plus mauvais, plus mal = better, best, worse and worst (irregular comparatives and superlatives)

 

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Plus je regarde la télévision, plus je la déteste
The more I watch television, the more I hate it.


Plus tu es beau, plus la vie est facile.
The more beautiful you are, the easier life is


Plus je fais de l'exercice, plus j'en ai envie  
The more I exercise, the more I want to


Plus j'écoute, moins je l'aime
The more I listen, the less I like it


Moins je dors, moins j'en ai besoin
The less I sleep, the less I need to


Plus nous sommes généreux, plus les gens nous le rendront.
The more generous we are, the more people will give back to us.


Q&A Forum 4 questions, 8 answers

MillerA2Kwiziq community member

Example translation

"Plus nous sommes généreux, plus les gens nous le rendront.

The more generous we are, the more people will give it back to us."

A better English translation would be:

The more generous we are, the more people will give back to us.

The "it" should be absent because we are speaking in general terms. The word "it" in English in this sentence implies a previously mentioned specific thing which is absent in this case. 


Asked 5 months ago
AurélieKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Bonjour Miller !

Je suis complètement d'accord ! L'exemple a été changé :)

Merci et bonne journée !

Example translation

"Plus nous sommes généreux, plus les gens nous le rendront.

The more generous we are, the more people will give it back to us."

A better English translation would be:

The more generous we are, the more people will give back to us.

The "it" should be absent because we are speaking in general terms. The word "it" in English in this sentence implies a previously mentioned specific thing which is absent in this case. 


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DianaA1Kwiziq community member

How then do you use "le plus" or "le moins"

Asked 3 years ago
DianaA1Kwiziq community member
Thank you...

How then do you use "le plus" or "le moins"

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TamaraA2Kwiziq community member

Another question concerning pronouncing the 's' of 'plus'

Hi Laura, similar to Aaron's question, I have a question concerning this example question - I think I have the answer, but needing confirmation, I thought that I would ask you. example: Plus nous sommes généreux, plus les gens nous le rendront. According to the recorded answer the 's' is not pronounced in the first section, however, it is in the second 'plus' is this to avoid confusion between ne..plus...in other words, to distinguish that it doesn't infer meaning of 'les gens ne nous le rendront plus' ? It has always seemed intuitive to me that the 's' gets pronounced, but just wanted to confirm thoughts.. thank you for your answer, Tamara
Asked 3 years ago
AurélieKwiziq team member

Bonjour Tamara !

The sound example was actually wrong, and thanks to you, it's now been fixed! In the expression "plus...plus...", you don't pronounce the 's' at the end of 'plus'.

Here is the fixed lesson:
https://french.kwiziq.com/my-languages/french/view/131

Merci !

Another question concerning pronouncing the 's' of 'plus'

Hi Laura, similar to Aaron's question, I have a question concerning this example question - I think I have the answer, but needing confirmation, I thought that I would ask you. example: Plus nous sommes généreux, plus les gens nous le rendront. According to the recorded answer the 's' is not pronounced in the first section, however, it is in the second 'plus' is this to avoid confusion between ne..plus...in other words, to distinguish that it doesn't infer meaning of 'les gens ne nous le rendront plus' ? It has always seemed intuitive to me that the 's' gets pronounced, but just wanted to confirm thoughts.. thank you for your answer, Tamara

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AaronC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Should the "s" be pronounced at the end of "plus" in this (positive) construction?

The example voice pronounces it before "les gens" but not elsewhere. Which is correct?
Asked 3 years ago
LauraKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Rebonjour Aaron,

Sorry about that. In certain expressions, including plus __ plus ___ and de plus en plus, pronouncing the s at the end of the plus is optional. (Unless of course there's a required liaison, as in de plus en plus.)

LauraKwiziq team member

Bonjour Aaron,

The general rule is that s at the end of the French word plus is pronounced when it's positive, and not when it's negative. So,

J'ai plus de temps = I have more time = s is pronounced.

Je n'ai plus de temps = I don't have any more time = s is silent.

AaronC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor
Thanks Laura! However, I'm afraid that perhaps I wasn't specific enough — I didn't realize my question would be posted on a separate page without the full context of the exercise that gave rise to it. My question was concerning the *plus [clause] plus [clause]* construction, which I did think might fall under the general rule, but since I posted it, I've read conflicting answers elsewhere. Some suggest that the *s* is not pronounced in this context, and some say that in this context both ways of saying *plus* are heard.
AaronC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor
Great, thanks again Laura!

Should the "s" be pronounced at the end of "plus" in this (positive) construction?

The example voice pronounces it before "les gens" but not elsewhere. Which is correct?

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